Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal

The traditional owners of Gunbalanya is the Gumurdul family who allow Injalak to operate on their land and are actively supportive of the art centre.

About 500 km from Darwin, you can find the region of Arnhem Land, in the Northern Territory. For six months of the year, you can cross the East Alligator River to Gunbalanya. For the remainder of the year, the river is too high, cutting Gunbalanya and the 1,200 people that live there, off from the rest of the country.

Like many First Nations communities, Gunbalanya is rich with culture and heritage, with a strong desire to pass on this traditional knowledge, particularly among young people. Indigenous community art centres play an important role in the artistic and cultural life of traditional Aboriginal artists living in remote communities.

Gunbalunya’s Injalak Arts centre in West Arnhem Land supports over 350 Indigenous Kunwinjku artists. They provide professional development programmes, workshops, mentoring support and On Country trips to collect art materials. Pre-COVID times, thousands of tourists would visit Injalak Arts every year to witness the art, music, natural environment, and many other culturally significant activities.

In the midst of COVID restrictions, with no visitors to the region allowed, Injalak Arts ran a two-week music workshop and a week-long live video production workshop that involved local musicians recording and rehearsing songs, as well as coaching and mentoring for eight members of the newly formed Media Unit who learnt all about live production. Thanks to a $10,000 Strengthening Rural Communities grant, funded by the Tim Fairfax Family Foundation, Injalak Arts was able to pay artist and consultation fees with Indigenous Australians who led the workshops.

The COVID-19 restrictions, and subsequent absence of any visitors to witness the performance, weren’t an issue for the production team, as the Media Unit used iPhones and iPads to stream the performance. People across the country were able to tune in, with some even watching from the UK.

The project brought the community together and provided an opportunity to demonstrate their creative expertise and talents, as well as developing new skills in live television production.

Injalak Arts’ Culture and Media Officer Alex Ressel explained the grant has had ongoing benefits for the community.

“We have since utilised this experience and equipment on other video projects in western Arnhem Land, so it is not necessary to employ external camera operators to document and live stream cultural events in western Arnhem Land.

“When bininj (Indigenous) people are behind the camera as well as in front of it, a radically different form of moving image work is created, enabling a culture to define its own mode of representation, ask the right questions.

“It means we can employ local Indigenous people and keep money circulating within community, as well as making the representation of Kunwinjku culture to wide and diverse audiences.”

Yuin Nation

Professional artists from the Bega Valley are invigorating Pambula Village with vibrant and colourful large-scale artworks, thanks to a bushfire recovery initiative.

Six commissioned pieces now complement a 22-site historic walking tour and are providing a boost to morale, employment and tourism.

The Bega Valley LGA was among the most impacted by the 2019/20 Black Summer bushfires, with 465 houses destroyed, 1,279 rural landholders impacted and around 60 per cent of the area burnt. Pambula has also experienced drought and COVID-19. The cumulative effects of all this have resulted in the loss of livelihoods, employment, prospects, wealth, environment, sense of security and mental wellbeing.

The Waislitz Family Foundation, in partnership with Australian Community Media, joined forces with FRRR after the Black Summer bushfires to support recovery. The Pambula arts project was granted $25,000 through FRRR’s Strengthening Rural Communities program, funded by the Waislitz Family Foundation in partnership with Australian Community Media.

Pambula Business Council President Michelle Pettigrove said the road back from the region’s losses is long and daunting and the ongoing Pambula Art Project gives this community a strong sense of unity, pride and direction.

“There is a discernible buzz on the street, tourists talk about the great community spirit of the town,” she said.

Artists get to exhibit their work to a large audience while helping increase Pambula’s profile and attract visitors to the Village and extended Bega Valley region. It’s boosting sales for local businesses and creating a more culturally vibrant community.

The Art Project was also mentioned frequently by voters when Pambula was named a finalist in the NSW Small Top Tourist Town awards.

While many buildings in Pambula have some historic significance, plain brick walls of newer buildings were identified as perfect ‘canvases’. Some artworks were painted directly onto buildings, and a clever solution using Laminex and aluminium panels meant others could be installed to building facades without causing damage.

Ms Pettigrove said the artworks were not designed to overpower the existing streetscape “but rather to illuminate and amplify Pambula’s historic, cultural and environmental identity, including the history and connection to country of the Yuin People – the original custodians of our region”.

A self-guided history walking tour map has also been produced, featuring 22 of Pambula’s historic buildings and sites to shine a spotlight on the fascinating and quirky history of the village and local identities. Pambula was the birthplace of Sir William McKell, the second Australian-born Governor General, and his home is now an art gallery. Syms Covington, who served with Sir Charles Darwin on ‘The Beagle’ retired to Pambula and continued to send Darwin samples of Australian flora and fauna for many years. Covington then served as postmaster in Pambula and his house is now a popular restaurant/gallery.

Future plans for the project include adding and celebrating more Yuin Nation history in the original self-guided History Walk, following ongoing extended consultation with both the Bega Aboriginal Land Council and the Twofold Aboriginal Corporation.

Ngaanyatjarra Country

Indigenous Rangers play a critical role in protecting the environment and managing country. In most places where they operate, they manage threatened species, manage the land using cool burns and fire and control feral animals – alongside developing tourism and cultural heritage activities.

The Indigenous Desert Alliance (IDA) runs an annual conference to bring together ranger groups from across the remote Southern Deserts to build Indigenous-led networks, leadership confidence and capability, increase skills relevant to Ranger groups and build advocacy for Indigenous land management. These rangers collectively manage an area approximately the size of Victoria.

The Forum is a highly regarded desert event that has been held annually since 2017, and focuses on maximising networking opportunities with an interactive program including workshops, tours, engaging conference sessions and stalls. It’s an important opportunity for Indigenous desert rangers to come together and build their alliance for personal and professional outcomes, to share their successes, challenges and opportunities, and to spend time with valued partners, stakeholders and experts.

Due to travel restrictions, the 2020 Southern Desert Rangers Forum and their Annual Conference were held online. The $25,000 grant IDA received from FRRR’s Strengthening Rural Communities program, funded by the Baxter Charitable Foundation, was originally intended to assist with the transport costs to bring five emergent remote ranger groups to Warakurna for the Forum. Instead, IDA used the funds to set up dedicated studios in Perth to run the events, with full technical support. IDA also purchased video conferencing equipment to enable the remote teams to participate in the events.

Despite meeting over Zoom, there was active participation and over 150 people in attendance over the three days the program ran, including 19 Australian Desert Ranger Groups from across the Southern Deserts, as well as rangers from the Misipawistik Cree Nations in Canada. There were presentations from Birriliburu Rangers, Rangers from APY Lands in SA, and Maralinga Tjarutja Rangers from Oak Valley.

Sessions included practical training components for rangers using GIS mapping software; co-design of education resources for weed eradication in the desert (developed in both Aboriginal language and in English); a presentation from the Threatened Species Commissioner; as well as open discussions around traditional knowledge of burning in the desert and implications for bushfires in populous coastal regions. Importantly, the highly-valued ‘Ranger to Ranger’ sessions still ran, where rangers develop and inform the priorities of the Indigenous Desert Alliance.

Emmanual Hondras, IDA Coordinator, said that there were unexpected outcomes resulting from the online delivery mode, including greater engagement between participants which he attributed to their increased comfort from being able to remain On Country.

“The IDA pivoted to ensure that our members in regional and remote Australia were still connected despite the scourge of COVID-19, providing the chance for leadership confidence and capability to grow through a new means, the opportunity for regional and remote priorities to be discussed and progressed, and the opportunity for these to be advocated to key political and bureaucratic leaders.

“Despite many people thinking it couldn’t be done, we managed to ‘keep the desert connected’ during a pandemic and during travel restrictions. It was a landmark event for Indigenous desert rangers in regional and remote communities.”

Emmanuel Hondras, IDA Coordinator

IDA used the learnings from this event to inform their Annual Conference, which was also run via video conference and attracted over 200 attendees. Thirty-one groups attended the Conference held in November – an astounding result, given that this was the first attempt at full forums / conferences via these means.

The $25,000 grant IDA received from FRRR’s Strengthening Rural Communities program, funded by the Baxter Charitable Foundation, was originally going to be used to assist with the transport costs to bring five emergent remote ranger groups to Warakurna for the forum. Instead, IDA set up dedicated studios in Perth to run the events, with full technical support. This is where the majority of total costs ended up falling, along with venue hire and catering. IDA also purchased video conferencing equipment to enable the remote teams to participate in the events.

IDA has since helped other not-for-profit organisations in the area, using their new-found knowledge and skills to assist with these organisations with their online events, which in itself is a great capacity building outcome.  

Baranggum Country

The small rural town of Hannaford on the Western Downs in Queensland is battling what would seem to be an endless drought. With a town of just 120 people consisting mostly of primary producers, they have been heavily impacted by an ongoing lack of rain.

Cue the vibrant and dedicated Hannaford Club Inc – a community club founded in 1946, originally to maintain the Hannaford Memorial Hall in honour of the fallen.

These days though, this Club does far more than that. With its dedicated volunteers and committee members, this proud community organisation hosts and runs countless fundraisers both for the town and further afield. From the Hannaford Tennis competition to the Dalby Christian Youth Camp, the seemingly tireless fundraising and support efforts of this Club have, over the years, proven integral to the town’s survival – not just proving their resilience, but also showcasing their indelible ability to prosper.

A big part of the Hannaford Club’s fundraising efforts involve catering for all these events, which often draw crowds in the hundreds. Unfortunately, outdated and slow catering equipment was increasing volunteer workloads, as well as service time for getting food to patrons. The Club identified that an upgrade was sorely needed.

With a grant from FRRR’s Strengthening Rural Communities program, funded by donor’s Dr George Jacobs and Dr Janice Hirshorn, the Club has been successful in obtaining new equipment.

The funds were used to purchase a high-volume, gas-operated deep oil fryer, an ambient cake display cabinet, and a high-volume gas-operated BBQ. With the ever-increasing patronage at their events, this improved equipment will enable the Club to continue to support not just events hosted by them, but it will benefit the wider region, as people are welcome to borrow the equipment for their own fundraising events.

Annie Hubbard from the Hannaford Club said that the Hannaford Campdraft held in May 2021 was their first catered fundraiser since the COVID lockdowns began.

“We were so proud to be able to more than adequately cater for a huge crowd of over 300 people quickly and efficiently. The new equipment was of great use – the volunteer catering committee and all attendees benefited significantly, and it is so very much appreciated!”

Koreng Country

It is a narrative that we so hear often in many remote, rural, and regional communities across the country. Severe weather that can cause drought, flooding, fires, and frost decimating crops and livestock in areas that survive on the agriculture industry. Major events like drought can affect farming regions for years and in doing so cause the residents of these towns extreme stress and anxiety.

In the town Jerramungup in Western Australia, they too are familiar with this narrative. For the past four years, this farming community has endured particularly dry seasonal conditions. With little rainfall and severe wind events, frosty winters and at least four fires, the soil conditions have been left bare and exposed, meaning farmers have struggled to earn an income. To add to the stressors, due to their deteriorating financial situation, many producers were forced to sell off a large majority of their sheep and cattle flocks.

These cumulative disasters seriously affect the mental health of those trying to maintain an income through farming. This current situation has caused many families to leave the town, causing higher rates of social isolation.

With this knowledge, the Fitzgerald Biosphere Group (FBG) took it upon themselves to create an event where residents could come together and “take a night off”. Since their inception in 2002, the FBG has been active facilitators of natural resource management projects including, strategic control of priority weeds, biodiversity conservation, on-farm trials, and sustainable agriculture climate adaptation. They have often held informative and educational events, but after the success of the 2019 Dancing in the Dirt Gala Ball, they knew it was important for the community to make sure it went ahead again in 2020.

With a $5,000 Strengthening Rural Communities (SRC) grant jointly funded by the Bertalli Family Foundation and FRRR, the FBG was able to cover the fees for the live entertainment. The 300 guests in attendance were treated to a night of music from a live band and a much-needed laugh from a comedian.

The FBG was pleased to report the complete success of the night. It was able to bring the adults of the town together for a night of fun and connection. It was so popular they needed to hire an extra bus to transport the guests safely to and from the event. When asked what they would do differently next time, they said they would have more people working to accommodate the popularity of the event.

Dancing in the Dirt achieved everything we had hoped – and more. Our little town was buzzing with excitement in the lead up to the event, it took our minds off the past few difficult seasons and gave our town a fresh focus and outlook on the season to come.”

Jessica Bailey, FBG Administration Officer

Australia has one of the highest skin cancer rates in the world, and more than 2,000 Australians die from this disease each year. If diagnosis occurs early, the fatality rate is significantly reduced. Outside Melbourne, skin specialists are limited with just 15 out of 199 dermatologists in Victoria holding clinics in eight country towns and centres. On top of this, there are no publicly funded skin cancer check programs in Victoria.

The Districts of Lions International in Victoria and Southern New South Wales identified a distinct need for a mobile skin cancer check and awareness unit to operate across Victoria and Southern NSW, and in particular, in remote areas and towns and centres not serviced, or fully serviced, by dermatologists or other skin specialists. In 2019, a group of trustees representing the five Lions Victorian districts and Southern NSW established the Lions V District Cancer Foundation Inc (LVDC). Its remit is to deliver improved health outcomes in rural areas by offering access to free skin cancer check-ups.

They received $25,000 in funds through FRRR’s Strengthening Rural Communities program, funded by The William Buckland Foundation (managed by Equity Trustees), to convert a van into a mobile screening clinic and purchase a truck to take it from town to town. The FRRR grant enabled the LVDC Foundation to leverage further grants, with the target total of $350,000 raised and exceeded with thanks to several corporate philanthropic donors, local Lions Club members and matched funding from the Lions Clubs International Foundation.

The screening van contains three examination areas equipped with dermascopes, enabling easier detection of suspect skin lesions. As Murray Baud, Assistant Treasurer & Foundation Trustee explained in the acquittal report, they canvassed and trained up volunteer dermoscopists who were willing to offer their services.

“With the appointments of a Screening Visit Coordinator and Driver Coordinator, the unit is now being booked by Lions Clubs across Victoria. The coordinators manage the process and identify screeners and driver logistics to maximise the efficiency of the unit as it travels. The unit was booked out for 2020 and has many reservations now in 2021 and even 2022.

“We took the mobile clinic to Canberra for the national Lions Convention, promoting a potential project for our northern states of NSW and Queensland. Media personality Deborah Hutton, who suffered from aggressive facial skin cancers, spoke in support of the project, and has now become an ambassador for the Lions Australia Skin Cancer projects.”

At the time writing, they’ve run 19 screening sessions in different rural towns, screening 1,005 people with 372 referrals to specialists.

Tommeginne Country

A group of young women from Tasmania’s north coast have taken ownership of their stories, thanks to a Strengthening Rural Communities grant.

For 27 years, Big HART Inc has found innovative ways to respond to disadvantage on the north-west coast of Tasmania. Young women are a particularly challenged cohort, but a program run by Big HART helps them build confidence and skills to succeed and steer their course away from negative social outcomes, at the same time as learning new digital skills.

Radio Diaries pairs young, disadvantaged women with professional audio artists to create compelling podcast pieces exploring the lives of young women, like themselves, growing up in a disadvantaged community.

A $10,000 grant, funded by the Bertalli Family Foundation, supported the development and presentation of the podcasts, including delivery of the workshops and mentoring. The participants, aged between 11 and 15 and at risk of disengaging from school, were identified by local schools, Rural Health Tasmania and youth services. Interest in the project and numbers for the audio skills workshops exceeded expectations.

What emerged was a compelling body of work. Radio Diaries was showcased at a celebratory community dinner, attended by 70 community members, to mark International Women’s Day in March 2020 including Government representatives. This included Trinity’s story, (watch – Facebook video with animation), which has since been showcased at an online audio conference presented by a leading podcast agency, and picked up by the ABC (listen).

“One of the key benefits of this event was that a number of young women who may ordinarily struggle with systemic challenges were able to feel heard. They were able to share their stories with a room full of community, friends, family, political and business representatives, and feel that they were being taken seriously.”

-Sam Hawker, National Producer, Big HART Inc

Through Radio Diaries, these young women became the storytellers and drivers of changing perceptions around their capabilities. They were given the chance to engage with others in the community and be trained up as citizen journalists, equipping them with new digital abilities, and bringing them a step closer to being prepared for the jobs of the future, armed with new confidence and support.

The Buchan Rodeo has been the highlight of the local event calendar for more than 50 years. Despite significant challenges, strong community leadership and strength overrode the challenging conditions and ensured this event proceeded in April 2021, considerably lifting local spirits and pride. 

Traditionally held on Easter Sunday, the event was postponed in 2020 due to impacts of the bushfire crisis six months prior. The bushfires began near Buchan in the East Gippsland region of Victoria in October 2019, well before the media began reporting on the crisis. Residents endured the threat for more than four months, often losing communication with the outside world.   

Buchan Rodeo Committee

Given their isolation and the lack of communication and media coverage, the remote community of Buchan has felt largely overlooked in their recovery phase. However, Buchan is a strong and resilient community, with sharpened skills in post-disaster recovery. 

In planning the 2021 Buchan Rodeo, there was much to consider in staging a COVID safe event. Despite this, the local volunteer committee was determined to proceed for the benefit of their community.

With only a 10-week lead time, much-needed funding and support came in the form of a $25,000 Strengthening Rural Communities grant, funded by the Firefight Australia Fund. This grant, along with support from other partnerships, not only allowed the Buchan Rodeo Committee to meet their safety guidelines and enhance their offering, but also enabled them to proceed with confidence.

The 2021 Buchan Rodeo was an electric event and though it saw many changes, it was heralded as one of the best-ever. It brought smiles back to those who worked so hard on the project and to the greater community who had endured so much.

“While the entire planet is enduring the COVID-19 crisis and looks to methods of recovery, we are still repairing our community in the aftermath of bushfires. A strong rural community is key and the staging of community building initiatives is of vital importance to us.” Buchan community member

In the communities of the Southern Beaches in Tasmania, which are home to around 5,000 residents, Okines Community House supports local residents through a range of programs offering opportunities for connection, learning and support. At the side of the House, a three-square metre converted shed houses the Food Co-op, which has 120 members including 55 active volunteers, and is highly valued in the community.

Okines

The Co-op runs a food assistance program for families in need, including a Breakfast Club, and the school and other local organisations purchase food from the Co-op for their programs. It plays an important role in providing access to nutritious, organic, ethically and sustainably sourced food with minimal packaging at affordable prices. The location is very convenient too, but the space is small.

Despite the Co-op volunteers resourcefully using every nook and cranny in the small shed, the lack of space was still very limiting for this growing enterprise, with shoppers cramped and having to wait outside when queuing to pay and nowhere to store orders for pick up.

To allow the venture to grow, Okines Community House sought funding from the Strengthening Rural Communities program. Their application outlined a 2×4 metre extension to the shed that would be used for storage and display, with a local contractor enlisted to build the extension, and in-kind support from OCH and Co-op volunteers in site preparation and cleaning.

With a $10,000 grant funded by John T Reid Charitable Trusts, they set to work in early 2020, and despite the challenges of COVID-19 restrictions, finished the extension in July 2020.

Their new space is user friendly – shoppers move around with more ease, and volunteers can work without bumping into one another! This is an expansion of infrastructure that has improved the efficiency and experience of the enterprise for everyone involved.

Includes more than $600,000 for Black Summer bushfire recovery

Ninety locally-led initiatives that are set to strengthen remote, rural and regional communities across Australia are sharing in $1,057,044 in funding, thanks to FRRR’s Strengthening Rural Communities (SRC) grant program.

More than $1M hits the ground in rural communities across the country

The SRC program supports a broad array of projects that address locally determined needs and priorities of smaller remote, rural, and regional communities, including places impacted by the 2019-20 bushfires.

For communities affected by the Black Summer bushfires, 34 community-led projects are sharing $602,958 in grants through SRC’s Bushfire Recovery stream of funding. These grants range from $2,618 for a communications upgrade for the Rocky Glen community in New South Wales, to $25,000 for a project that will improve the safety and security of the community hall at Tamrookum in Queensland.

A further $454,086 in grants have been awarded through SRC’s Small & Vital funding stream to 56 projects that local communities have prioritised for their long-term viability and vitality. Funding ranges from $550 for an equipment safety upgrade for the Riding for the Disabled WA group at Mount Barker in Western Australia, through to $10,000 for a grief support program for young people in Drysdale, Victoria.

Natalie Egleton, CEO of FRRR, said FRRR is seeing a wide range of requests from across the country, reflecting the diverse needs in each place.

“Rural communities continue to inspire and move forward despite the numerous difficulties they’ve faced and the uncertainty ahead. They want something to hope for, to build towards, and we continue to be here to support and celebrate their achievements and are ready to walk with them through any challenges they may be dealing with, or to harness any opportunities they have in front of them.

“With COVID-19 restrictions still being unpredictable, we want groups to know that if you have received a grant from us and, for whatever reason, you have had to delay, postpone or cancel your project, please reach out to our team. We want to work with you to adapt or redefine your project so that the funding stays in your community,” Ms Egleton explained.

With the 2021-22 bushfire season approaching, disaster preparedness is key, especially for those communities devastated by the 2019-20 bushfires.

“Being better prepared means different things for different places. For some, this means improving access to community meeting places, for others it’s ensuring they have the proper equipment and training so that volunteers can protect and support their community through a disaster event. But for some places, preparedness means completely rebuilding community infrastructure that was lost due to the bushfires,” Ms Egleton said.

“We are pleased to be able to provide this support to the communities that have been affected by the fires. And we’ll continue to support them as time goes on and their needs evolve and change.”

Some of the 90 projects awarded include:

  • Lions Club of Ulladulla Milton, NSW – FAB (Farmers at Burrill) – $14,896 – Boost local spending with improved marketing and entertainment at the farmers markets.   
  • Engawala Arts Centre Aboriginal Corporation, NT – Developing the Engawala Arts Centre – $8,595 – Facilitate the set up and development of an Arts Centre that will build tourism-based income in a very remote community.
  • The Little Pocket Association, QLD – Resilience through Nature Play – $25,000 – Support children and young families to build resilience and disaster preparedness through nature play, storytelling and strengthening connection to place.
  • Tatiara District Council, SA – Tatiara Multicultural Food Festival – $9,900 – Encourage whole community engagement and build cultural awareness through the delivery of a food festival.
  • Swansea Primary School Parents and Friends Association, TAS – Nature Play for Rural Families – $10,000 – Strengthen community connection to the natural environment and enhance educational activities for school children through the development of a Nature Play Garden area.
  • Lakes Entrance Mechanics Institute Management Committee Inc, VIC – Replacement of Furniture as part of Maintaining and Redeveloping the Lakes Entrance Mechanics Institute Hall – $17,249 – Provide a fit-for-purpose facility and help volunteers to support their community through the purchase of stackable chairs.
  • Active Farmers Ltd, WA – Active Farmers Games WA – Increasing Awareness of the Link Between Physical Activity and Improved Mental Wellbeing – $6,340 – Encourage rural communities to be physically active and more connected with inaugural WA Active Farmers Games.

The SRC program is collaboratively supported by a number of generous donors, which are listed on FRRR’s website.

The next round of SRC applications is currently being assessed and will be announced in December. The current round is accepting applications until 23 November 2021, with funds to be awarded in March 2022.

More information is available on FRRR’s website – https://frrr.org.au/ strengthening-rural-communities/.

To support grants like this through FRRR, make a tax-deductible donation at frrr.org.au/giving/.

The full list of grant recipients and their projects are below.

Jump to: NSW | NT | QLD | SA | TAS | VIC | WA

OrganisationProjectLocationGrant
NEW SOUTH WALES
Bushfire Recovery
Mad Proppa Deadly Indigenous CorporationReVibe - Northern NSW Music Workshop Tour (Tamworth/Armidale)
Inspire community to come together to celebrate culture through music writing, production and recording workshops.
Armidale$25,000
Trustees of the Roman Catholic Church for the Archdiocese of Canberra & Goulburn as Trustee for Marymead Child and Family CentreRural Rugby: Resilient Recovery
Encourage young people to be active and enhance their mental health and nutrition through a school based after-school rugby enrichment program.
Batehaven$25,000
Campfire Co-op LtdParticipatory Leadership Training for South Coast Bushfire Affected Communities
Develop leadership skills by training community members in bushfire-impacted areas the Art of Hosting Conversations.
Bega Valley$25,000
Southcoast Health and Sustainability AlliancePower on the Move
Boost the community’s ability to respond to future disasters by purchase of a mobile generator, to be made available free of charge for use by the community.
Bodalla$25,000
Capital Region Community Services LimitedBungee Youth Resilience Program in Braidwood
Boost and strengthen the resilience of young people by running a creative art based program.
Braidwood$21,432
Lions Club of Ulladulla MiltonFAB (Farmers at Burrill)
Boost local spending with improved marketing and entertainment at the farmers markets.
Burrill Lake$14,896
Comboyne Community Association IncTowards Opening Day
Boost and strengthen the local economy by restoring the original farmhouse fireplace in the Comboyne Museum complex.
Comboyne$9,200
Copmanhurst Pre-School IncAboriginal Mural and Art Lessons
Improve access to local recovery activities for children and families at Copmanhurst Preschool by providing a local Indigenous artist to offer Indigenous Art classes and a mural at the centre.
Copmanhurst$3,750
Eden Community Access Centre IncBuilding Social Capital and Enhancing Social Outcomes
Boost and strengthen the local economy by employing a Resilience and Recovery Officer to help find local solutions to bushfire recovery.
Eden$25,000
Marine Rescue Merimbula
Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW
Marine Rescue Merimbula Training Computer
Boost capacity of Marine Rescue Merimbula to provide essential volunteer training through the purchase of computer equipment.
Merimbula$5,000
Catholic Parish of St Mary's Star of the Sea MiltonShoalhaven Rising from the Ashes - Stage 2
Boost the community’s bushfire recovery by hiring a coordinator to facilitate & create art-based community workshops.
Milton$13,587
Salt CareWarehouse Food Storage Expansion
Support for individuals and families living with disadvantage through the purchase and fit out of additional warehouse storage for distribution of needed personal and household items.
Nowra$24,600
Oberon and District Museum Society IncFitout of New Forest and Timber Interpretive Center
Boost local spending in Oberon by developing the Forest and Timber Interpretive Centre.
Oberon$21,614
Pambula Chamber of Commerce & Associates Inc Pambula Art Project - Stage 2
Boost and strengthen the local economy through creation and installation of art trail murals.
Pambula$25,000
Borah Creek Public Hall Land ManagerSupply and Install Telstra and Optus YAGI Communications Systems in the Hall
Improve the community's ability to communicate with the outside world in cases of emergency by installing a mobile phone signal boosting antenna.
Rocky Glen$2,618
First Steps Count IncorporatedMany Hands Build, Create and Unite - Our Design Journey
Encourage people to come together and celebrate through art workshops leading to a collaborative artwork.
Taree$25,000
Manning River Aero Club IncMRAC Solar
Boost the community’s ability to respond to future disasters by installing a solar power and battery system to provide a backup in case of power failures.
Taree$25,000
One Vision Productions LimitedEMPOWER our Community
Celebrate and cultivate a sense of identity and cultural connection for Indigenous youth through Caring for Country music and film workshops.
Tweed Heads$25,000
Small & Vital
Bellingen Youth Orchestra IncorporatedVolunteer Management Strategy
Increase the sustainability and profile of Bellingen Youth Orchestra and reduce volunteer fatigue through implementing a Volunteer Management Strategy and website.
Bellingen$8,000
Berry Branch
Country Womens Association of NSW
Community Craft Workshops for a Sustainable Future
Boost creativity, connection and support for local artists by providing a series of sustainable craft workshops.
Berry$3,300
Forbes Public School P&C Association IncWiradjuri Mural Project at Forbes Public School
Enhance community connection and cultural identity through Forbes Public School students painting a mural with local Wiradjuri Indigenous artist.
Forbes$5,000
Adavale Lane Community Centre IncorporatedLight Up and Cool Adavale Lane Community Centre
Increase community usage and functionality by lighting up and cooling down the Adavale Lane Community Hall.
Goonumbla$10,000
Mona Magazine
Western Riverina Arts Inc
Mona Women's Magazine - Second Edition
Enhance rural women's identity, wellbeing and sense of place by printing the 2nd edition of Mona Magazine, paying for the contributors' pieces and contributing to wages for the editorial staff.
Leeton$10,000
Boori Dreaming Womens GroupAwakening the Dream
Increase cultural identity and creativity through purchasing sewing machines, equipment and craft supplies for Boori Dreaming Women's Group.
Narrandera$2,860
Umina Beach Branch
Country Womens Association of NSW
Build Accessible Ramp
New entry and accessible bathroom with one accessible toilet and second toilet plus a shower. Increase accessibility of the Umina Beach CWA hall by installing a wheelchair accessible ramp.
Umina Beach$4,325
Tharpa Choeling IncorporatedRed Rattler Community Garden
Increase community participation and connection by converting a vintage train carriage into a new community garden.
Wellington$9,247
Circartus Incorporated Governance Guidance and Review
Enhance community connection and creativity by engaging an industry- experienced governance consultant to ensure the sustainability of Circartus.
Wingham$9,750
Woodstock Branch
Country Womens Association of NSW
Improving Our Street Cred
Increase community participation and functionality through the refurbishment of the Woodstock Branch CWA hall.
Woodstock$9,865
NORTHERN TERRITORY
Small & Vital
Engawala Arts Centre Aboriginal CorporationDeveloping the Engawala Arts Centre
Facilitate the set up and development of an Arts Centre that will build tourism based income in a very remote community.
Engawala$8,595
West Daly Regional CouncilWadeye, Nganmarriyanga and Peppimenarti Annual Clean-up Day
Reduce health and safety risks via a Community Clean Up Day to remove rubbish in remote communities.
Wadeye$7,578
Wagait Shire CouncilWagait Youth Program
Encourage young people to be physically active and participate in community activities, with Youth Group excursions and skateboard clinics.
Wagait Beach$6,000
QUEENSLAND
Bushfire Recovery
The Little Pocket AssociationResilience through Nature Play
Support children and young families to build resilience and disaster preparedness through nature play, storytelling and connection to place.
Beechmont$25,000
Wildlife Noosa LtdNoosa Bushfire Readiness & Myna Bird Project
Support recovery from bushfires and volunteer training through purchase of a vehicle and equipment to improve disaster preparedness and conservation efforts.
Cooran$12,248
Charters Towers State Emergency Service
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services
Ladder Racks for Operational Response Vehicles
Support volunteers' safety and capacity to respond to emergencies through provision of ladder racks on response vehicles.
Pentland$5,680
Tamrookum Memorial Hall IncorporatedHall Restoration
Increase safety and support recovery through upgrade of community owned hall.
Tamrookum$25,000
Tin Can Bay Community and Mens Shed IncorporatedStorage Shed
Support community recovery and wellbeing through purchase of a storage shed for materials and equipment.
Tin Can Bay$15,336
Small & Vital
Atherton Performing Arts IncAtherton Performing Arts Lighting Equipment - New Lighting Desk Console
Expand the use of the Atherton Performing Arts theatre by installing a new lighting console.
Atherton$7,997
Barcaldine Rugby League Football Club Inc"Bluey Live!" Kids' Concert, Meet & Greet
Strengthen social connection and encourage culturally vibrant communities through a "Bluey Live!" kids' concert for the remote community of Barcaldine and surrounds.
Barcaldine$10,000
Beeron Road Country Club IncBeeron Road Country Club Community Hub Development
Grow ways to support the community through refurbishment of a disused school into a vibrant rural Community Hub.
Beeron$10,000
Selectability LtdSelectability Mental Health Toolbox
Improve mental health of remote communities by developing an online training course to strengthen community capacity to identify and support one another.
Cloncurry$9,775
Cooktown School of Art Society IncComputer System Plus Reception Area Upgrade
Strengthen and increase volunteer capacity and access to online training, by installing a new computer system and reception desk.
Cooktown$10,000
Gloucester Sports and Recreation Ass IncOutdoor Theatre
Promote recovery centre and encourage people to come together by installing an outdoor venue screen and projector.
Hideaway Bay$10,000
Malanda Chamber of Commerce IncorporatedMalanda’s Adventure Park
Encourage children's development and increase community connection through installation of a fence around a new adventure playground.
Malanda$10,000
Gidgee Healing
Mount Isa Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Limited
Women's Group
Boost social inclusion and wellbeing through delivery of a monthly Women's Group for Indigenous women in Mount Isa.
Mount Isa$10,000
Highways and Byways LtdSeeds of Connection - Healing and Belonging Through Culture
Enhance cultural identity, resilience and wellbeing of Indigenous children and their families in Roma by providing a two week cultural immersion program for 7-12 year olds.
Roma$9,740
Care Balonne Association IncProvide Safe Accessibility Services to Care Balonne Clients and Staff
Improve the use and accessibility of the Care Balonne community hub through toilet facility upgrade.
St George$10,000
Texas Show Society Upgrade to Showground Facilities
Increase amenity and participation in community events by providing a grandstand for the Texas Showgrounds.
Texas$10,000
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
Bushfire Recovery
Adelaide and Hills Koala Rescue - 1300KOALAZ IncorporatedVegetation Regeneration Planting
Conserve native habitat and support recovery from 2019 bushfires through the restoration of bushland.
Cudlee Creek$24,289
Edithburgh Football Club and Sports AssocCommunity and Sporting Clubs Working to Improve Community Safety
Improve a location that provides refuge in times of emergency through the installation of water tanks.
Edithburgh$22,090
Small & Vital
Andamooka Progress and Opalminers Association IncCommunity Facility Rationalisation & Development Project – Upgrade 'Old Community Church' to Passive Recreation Facility
Encourage community engagement and social wellbeing by enhancing facilities.
Andamooka$10,000
Tatiara District CouncilTatiara Multicultural Food Festival
Encourage whole community engagement and build cultural awareness through the delivery of a food festival.
Bordertown$9,900
Cummins & District Enterprise CommitteeWinter Wonderland - Platform for Success
Improve an organisation’s ability to support the community and strengthen the town's revenue through developing a storage shed used for the Cummins Christmas display.
Cummins$4,140
Bedford Kadina
Bedford Phoenix Incorporated
Kadina Pergola and Deck for Supported Employees
Expand supported employment opportunities for people living with a disability in Kadina through the construction of pergola and deck.
Kadina$10,000
The Food Embassy IncorporatedSupporting Citizens in Creating Local and Sustainable Food Systems
Provide opportunities for local people to gain knowledge about growing and consuming healthy foods, through the delivery of the Food Matters program in Strathalbyn and Milang.
Strathalbyn$9,585
TASMANIA
Small & Vital
Lions Club of Lilydale IncorporatedLilydale Men's Community Shed
Support volunteer skill development and encourage social interaction, through the establishment of a Men's Shed in Lilydale.
Lilydale$10,000
Freycinet Volunteer Marine Rescue Association IncPutting You Through Now!
Boost safety and disaster preparedness by installing telecommunications hardware at a remote Marine Rescue facility.
Swansea$2,244
Swansea Primary School Parents and Friends AssociationNature Play for Rural Families
Strengthen community connection to the natural environment and enhance educational activities for school children through the development of a Nature Play Garden area.
Swansea$10,000
Coastal FM IncDevelopment of Recording Studio
Improve connection to community and broaden the capability of a community-run radio station through establishing a recording studio.
Wynyard$5,000
VICTORIA
Bushfire Recovery
Bright Spring Festival
Bright and District Chamber of Commerce Incorporated
Bright Spring Festival Drive-In Movie
Boost a community festival by providing a family-friendly activity and support recovery from the 2019/2020 bushfires by holding a drive-in movie night.
Bright$5,000
Cassilis Recreation Reserve Committee of ManagementLiving it Up
Increase opportunities to support local connectedness and recover from the 2019/2020 bushfires through the delivery of a whole community music event.
Cassilis$4,290
Lakes Entrance Mechanics Institute Management Committee IncReplacement of Furniture as part of Maintaining and Redeveloping the Lakes Entrance Mechanics Institute Hall
Provide a fit-for-purpose facility and help volunteers to support their community through the purchase of stackable chairs.
Lakes Entrance$17,249
Traralgon Men's Shed and Woodworking IncMallacoota Picnic Tables and Benches
Increase connection to place and build community partnerships through the provision of outdoor furniture for Mallacoota township.
Mallacoota$20,000
Mitta Valley Community TV IncMitta Valley Community Translator Project
Provide reliable communication transmission and safeguard the community through the upgrade of telecommunications equipment in a remote valley.
Mitta Mitta$10,000
1st Myrtleford Scout Group
The Scout Association of Australia Victorian Branch
Community is Key
Provide a refuge in times of emergency and boost an organisation's capacity to offer a fit for purpose space through the upgrade of facility.
Myrtleford$24,954
Ramahyuck District Aboriginal CorporationRamahyuck Connection through Art Project
Promote local culture, and support health and social recovery post-bushfires for First Nations people through painting the exterior of the Ramahyuck District Aboriginal Corporation building.
Sale$8,910
Community Centre Swifts Creek IncRoofing Rescue
Improve the amenity of a community centre and create a safe, fit-for-purpose environment through the upgrade of a roof.
Swifts Creek$21,660
Wyeeboo Recreation Reserve Wyeeboo Recreation Reserve - Water Tank
Increase preparedness for future disaster events through the provision of a water tank.
Tallangatta Valley$19,555
Small & Vital
East Gippsland Ceramic Group IncFiring Up
Encourage development of skills and social connection through the purchase of a pottery kiln and wheels.
Bairnsdale$10,000
Bendigo Queer Film FestivalBendigo Queer Film Festival Post-COVID Relaunch
Foster mental health and celebrate local culture and identity for a marginalised group through the delivery of a community film festival.
Bendigo$6,565
Wombat's WishPost-Camp Counselling Sessions
Increase opportunities for bereavement support and improve the health, wellbeing and education outcomes for young people through the initiation of a grief support program.
Drysdale$10,000
Everton Primary SchoolAssisting with Cost of Construction of Outside Decking
Encourage community gathering, and children's learning and development by installing decking at the local primary school.
Everton$10,000
Mittagundi Outdoor Education CentreA Sustainable Kitchen for Mittagundi: Providing Life-Changing Experiences for Young People
Increase connection to the environment and enhance educational experiences for young people through the upgrade of a communal kitchen.
Glen Valley$3,200
Eventide Lutheran HomesGolf Buggy Funding
Support health and wellbeing and encourage positive ageing, through the purchase of a mobility aid.
Hamilton$10,000
The Trustee for The MAC TrustThe Mac Goes Online
Strengthen opportunities for employment, education and social engagement by providing an electronic ticket system for a community-run cinema.
Mansfield$9,000
Murtoa CollegeMurtoa College in Full Swing
Encourage youth engagement and improve health and wellbeing through the installation of specialised playground equipment for senior students.
Murtoa$10,000
Murtoa's Big Weekend
Shared Learning & Activities Murtoa Incorporated
‘Light Up’ Murtoa’s Big Weekend in 2021
Support Murtoa township's economic recovery and strengthen social engagement through the delivery of a community festival.
Murtoa$10,000
Repair Cafe Bellarine
Bellarine Training and Community Hub
Repair Cafe Bellarine
Increase reach of a repair cafe service through the development and delivery of social media and marketing.
Ocean Grove$2,515
Romsey Neighbourhood House IncYOUTHINK
Expand employment opportunities for youth by purchasing a barista machine for hospitality training.
Romsey$9,145
Surf Coast Energy Group (SCEG)Spring Creek Sustainable Futures - Surf Coast, Victoria
Boost the community’s ability to learn about conservation management and increase connection to place through the delivery of community engagement workshops.
Torquay$9,930
Yarrawonga Neighbourhood House IncConnecting our Community through Education and Information
Enhance the delivery of first aid training programs and encourage further education, by purchasing appropriate equipment that reflects real-life medical trauma.
Yarrawonga$9,406
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Small & Vital
Albany Youth Support AssociationSafe Space for Homeless Youth to Sleep in Swags
Increase access to temporary housing for young people sleeping rough by enclosing verandah at emergency accommodation facility.
Albany$7,230
Live To Tell Your Story IncDjinda Ngardak - Making it My Business
Promote healthy lifestyles and improved health and wellbeing while growing opportunities for Indigenous students to pursue careers in hospitality, with week-long cooking skills camp.
Albany$10,000
Enterprise Partnerships WA LimitedPiriwa Place Making Project
Support economic opportunities for Indigenous women while increasing access to affordable clothing with expansion of innovative Op Shop project.
Balgo $10,000
Jarlmadangah Burru Aboriginal CorporationCultural Centre Entrance Improvements
Increase comfort and amenity through refurbishment of Cultural Centre’s entrance with installation of a shade sail.
Derby$9,196
Greenbushes Community Resource CentreThe New You - Working Through Change And Loss
Help people to recover and adapt through delivery of workshop on coping with change and loss.
Greenbushes$1,650
Marble Bar Primary SchoolSTEM Education
Increase engagement in school in remote community through provision of virtual reality equipment to enhance innovative digital arts program.
Marble Bar$9,958
Riding for the Disabled WA Plantagenet Group IncEquipment Maintenance and Safety
Support riding program for children with a disability, with OH&S upgrade of trailer used for transporting riding equipment.
Mt Barker$550
Nungarin Heritage Machinery & Army Museum IncAunty Jim's (re) Store
Enhance authentic historical shop display within the Nungarin Machinery & Army Museum, with new linoleum floor coverings.
Nungarin$6,500
Active Farmers LtdActive Farmers Games WA - Increasing Awareness of the Link Between Physical Activity and Improved Mental Wellbeing
Encourage rural communities to be physically active and more connected with inaugural WA Active Farmers Games.
Torbay$6,340