Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal

Networks to Build Drought Resilience and Drought Resilience Leaders

FRRR will soon be providing increased support into remote, rural and regional communities to prepare for the impacts of drought, after being selected by the Australian Government to deliver its Networks to Build Drought Resilience program. FRRR is also part of a consortium delivering the Drought Resilience Leaders program.

Funded through the Australian Government’s $5 billion Future Drought Fund, both programs will help remote, rural and regional people access the tools, skills and support to build and foster leader networks, and to develop and roll out drought resilience initiatives in their communities.

The Networks to Build Drought Resilience (NBDR) program will help people in agricultural communities to develop skills, participate in risk management planning, and foster projects that encourage connectedness and improve wellbeing. It will also support small-scale infrastructure projects to make community facilities drought resilient to increase overall wellbeing and reduce social isolation.

Natalie Egleton, CEO of FRRR, said that the Networks to Build Drought Resilience program will support future-focussed initiatives led by local community groups and network organisations that play such a vital role in local and regional resilience

“Networks and community leadership are the backbone of strong, vibrant communities and are essential to ensuring future preparedness for drought and the associated social, economic, environmental impacts that can be so devastating for remote, rural, and regional communities.

“This is an exciting opportunity for building drought resilience from the ground up and we look forward to supporting the fantastic ideas and solutions that we know are ready to go across the country,” Ms Egleton said.

Through the Drought Resilience Leaders (DRL) program rural leaders will be able to access training and support that will help them to develop and undertake a project to build drought resilience in their communities. Partnering with the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation (ARLF) and the Rural Economies Centre of Excellence (RECoE), FRRR will manage a grants stream that will allow leadership program participants and their communities to activate their community-strengthening ideas.

Ms Egleton said that this program means more opportunities for local people to take the lead in finding meaningful and tailored solutions for their community’s increased climate resilience.

“Local leaders know how to get things done. They know how to bring people together, to motivate and to problem-solve. Backing these leaders is key to ensuring the long-term vitality of Australia’s remote, rural and regional communities, particularly those battling drought.

“We are thrilled to be partnering with the ARLF and RECoE to provide these local leaders with access to such invaluable training and help them to bring their drought resilience projects to life,” Ms Egleton said.

For more information visit
The Hon David Littleproud MP – https://minister.awe.gov.au/littleproud/media-releases/drought-leaders-networks-programs
Australian Rural Leadership Foundation – https://rural-leaders.org.au/arlf-to-lead-consortia-to-deliver-drought-program/ 

The Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal (FRRR) has awarded $1,454,165 in grants for 41 community-led projects that will help tackle the challenges that drought-affected communities across Australia continue to face through its award-winning grants program, Tackling Tough Times Together (TTTT). [1]

The grants will support a wide range of initiatives that are designed to meet the needs of people in each drought-affected place, from Lake Cargelligo in NSW, Atitjere in the NT, Hughenden in QLD, Truro in SA, Murrayville in VIC, to Brookton in WA. These projects will help to create community cohesion and resilience by creating supportive environments, reducing social isolation and increasing community engagement in remote, rural, and regional communities across drought-affected Australia.

Although parts of New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia having received substantial rainfall this year, these regions, as well as many other parts of the country, continue to be affected by the long-term impacts of persistent rainfall deficits[2]

Nina O’Brien, Disaster Resilience & Recovery Lead for FRRR, said that while it’s no longer on the front pages, the impact of the ongoing drought continues to be top-of-mind for FRRR.

“Despite recent rain in some places, we know the effects of long-term rainfall deficits don’t just disappear. It takes 18 to 24 months of sustained average rainfalls for communities to finally be able to move beyond the immediate impacts of drought. Most communities have had nowhere near this amount of rain – and many have had none at all, which is why communities still need support. This has been made evident by the record value of funding requests we received for this round of TTTT,” Ms O’Brien said.

“The pandemic has added extra financial strain to communities already dealing with drought, adding to the pressure felt by many local groups, including very fatigued volunteers. Community cohesion plays such an important role in drought recovery and COVID-19 restrictions have only exacerbated the social isolation and disengagement that many of these communities have been working hard to tackle.

“In spite of the difficulties, we are inspired by the many local organisations that persistently work to develop the places where they live. These groups are so resilient and continue to find ways to seed and strengthen, adapt and evolve, and innovate and renew their community. They are finding ways to bring their community together and build that social cohesion, whether it be through community events and festivals, making things more accessible for people living with disability, or by repairing and upgrading facilities to create a safe place for locals to gather.

“Thanks to the support of our donor partners, we can take a little pressure off them and help their great ideas come to fruition,” Ms O’Brien said.

Some of the 41 projects awarded this round include:

  • Aldersyde Agricultural Hall Inc, WA – Aldersyde Agricultural Hall – $110,000 – Increased accessibility and reduced volunteer fatigue through upgrades to the Aldersyde Agricultural Hall kitchen, toilet facilities, water storage, verandah and parking area.
  • Upper Lachlan Shire Council, NSW – 2021 Gunning Arts Festival – $6,925 – Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability and sustainability of the 2021 Gunning Arts Festival to provide opportunities for economic growth and community connection whilst supporting the arts in regional Australia.
  • The Rex Monto Limited, QLD – The Rex: Theatre, Gallery and Community Hub – $ 58,500 – Enhance community identity with the restoration and development of a theatre, gallery, and community Hub at The Rex.
  • Isolated Children’s Parents’ Association (Port Augusta Branch), SA – ‘Bush Kids Honey’ – $19,186 – Support opportunities for social and educational participation and address disadvantage caused by the drought, for children and young people through the provision of bee hives for Students of the Air – Port Augusta region.
  • Outback Highway Development Council – Harts Range/ Atitjere, NT – Outback Way Outdoor Gallery – Installation – $60,000 Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity, capability and sustainability to support the community through the installation of billboards of local artwork along highway.
  • Murrayville and District Liaison Committee, VIC – Pioneer Park Playground Shade Structure – $17,303 Reduce social isolation by facilitating social connection through the installation of shade over the Pioneer Park Playground, Murrayville.

Tackling Tough Times Together is possible thanks to the collaborative support of several donors, including the Australian Government which committed $15M to be distributed over three years. Generous contributions have also been made by Pratt Foundation, Stockland CARE Foundation, Paul Ramsay Foundation, The Snow Foundation, Tim Fairfax Family Foundation, Henroth Group and private donors from across the nation.

Applications for the TTTT program are always open and groups in areas currently drought-affected, or that have been affected in the last 18 months, are encouraged to apply for funding support.

The cut-off dates for future rounds are:

  • 25 February 2021. Outcomes will be advised late May 2021.
  • 24 May 2021. (Note, full applications for the $150,000 grant tier must be received by 13 April 2021.) Outcomes will be advised late August 2021.

The full list of grant recipients and their projects are below.

Jump to : WA | NSW | NT | QLD | SA | VIC

OrganisationProjectLocationGrant
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Up to $150,000
Aldersyde Agricultural Hall IncorporatedAldersyde Hall Facility UpgradeIncreased accessibility and reduced volunteer fatigue through upgrades to the Aldersyde Agricultural Hall kitchen, toilet facilities, water storage, verandah, and parking area.Aldersyde$110,000
NEW SOUTH WALES
Up to $60,000
Blayney Town Association52 Weeks of CreativityReduce social isolation and enhance local tourism through the provision of Blayney’s 52 Weeks of creativity including workshops, community gatherings, school holiday activities, markets, and live music events at the recently restored Blayney Railway Station “Platform” facility.Blayney$47,820
Bourke & District Children’s ServicesCo-location of Early Childhood and Integrated Health ServicesEnhance social and educational participation for children disadvantaged by drought through the development of a feasibility plan for the Bourke district.Bourke$57,000
Lakes Alive Progress Association IncorporatedWater Tower Mural Lake Cargelligo Enhance local economic recovery and renewal through the development of the Lake Cargelligo Water Tower Mural.Lake Cargelligo$59,960
Nymboida Canoeing LimitedNymboida Volunteer HubReduce social isolation and increase organisational capacity and capability through the expansion of the Nymboida Volunteer Hub.Nymboida$60,000
Sunnyside Hall Management Committee IncorporatedRe-Roofing Sunnyside HallUpgrade meeting space that supports connectedness for drought affected residents, through replacement of roof and guttering at Sunnyside Hall.Tenterfield$36,500
Up to $20,000
Friends of the Gwydir Fitness Centre
Gwydir Shire Council
Gwydir Fitness Centre equipment programReduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of Friends of the Gwydir Fitness Centre through the provision of exercise equipment at the Warialda and Bingara Community Gyms.Bingara$17,973
Moree Mainly Music Group
Mainly Music (Australia) Limited
Moree Mainly Music GroupSupport opportunities for social and educational participation and address disadvantage caused by the drought, for children through the provision of music session structures and materials for Moree Mainly Music Group.Moree$867
Murrurundi Community Men’s Shed IncorporatedMurrurundi Men’s Shed ExtensionReduce social isolation by facilitating strong social cohesion and connection through the expansion of the Murrurundi Community Men’s Shed facility.Murrurundi$17,320
Pilliga Community Centre IncorporatedNew WindowsReduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of the Pilliga Community Centre through the installation of new windows.Pilliga$6,657
Gunning Arts Festival Section 355 Committee
Upper Lachlan Shire Council
2021 Gunning Arts FestivalReduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability and sustainability of the 2021 Gunning Arts Festival to provide opportunities for economic growth, community connection whilst supporting the arts in regional Australia.Gunning$6,925
Warren Chamber Music Festival IncorporatedWarren Chamber Music FestivalReduce social isolation, enhance educational participation for young people, and stimulate local economy through the delivery of the Warren Chamber Music Festival.Nevertire$20,000
NORTHERN TERRITORY
Up to $60,000
Outback Highway Development Council IncorporatedOutback Way Outdoor Gallery – InstallationSupport economic recovery and renewal through the installation of 14 outdoor billboards of local artwork along the Plenty Highway in the NT.Harts Range/ Atitjere$60,000
QUEENSLAND
Up to $60,000
Back Plains Primary Parents and Citizens AssociationEnclosing our Covered Outside Learning AreaEnhance social and educational participation for children disadvantaged by drought through enhancements to the covered outdoor learning space at the Back Plains State School.Back Plains$25,410
Bidjara Media and Broadcasting Company LimitedExpansion of Broadcasting & News ServicesReduce social isolation through the expansion of Bidjara Media and Broadcasting community radio into Thargomindah, Quilpie, St George, and Roma.Thargomindah$60,000
Bollon and District Community Group Incorporated“Click goes the Shears in Bollon”Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of a local not-for-profit organisation to provide support to their community through the enhancement of the Bollon Heritage Centre enabling under cover space to restore, showcase and preserve local historical artefacts.Bollon$60,000
Bungunya State School Parents and Citizens Committee“Operation Outdoors”Enhance social and educational participation for children disadvantaged by drought through the installation of an undercover learning space and an irrigation system at Bungunya State School.Bungunya$59,245
Charleville Community Men’s Shed IncorporatedCharleville Community Men’s Shed IncorporatedReduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of a local not-for-profit organisation to provide support to their community, through enhancements at the Charleville Community Men’s Shed.Charleville$60,000
Chinchilla Historical Society IncorporatedThe Fire Towers Interpretive CentreEnhance local economic recovery and renewal through the development of the Chinchilla Historical Society’s Fire Towers Interpretive Centre adding to local tourism offerings.Chinchilla$45,748
Proston Men’s Shed IncorporatedProston Men’s Shed IncorporatedIncreased capacity to deliver community activities and reduce social isolation, through fit out of newly constructed Men’s Shed in Proston.Proston$59,972
Hughenden State Emergency Service (SES) Group
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services
Training and Storage roomsReduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity, capability, and sustainability through enhancements at the Hughenden SES Shed.Hughenden$44,228
Jericho State Emergency Service (SES)
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services
SES Jericho Facility Fit outReduce volunteer fatigue and build organisational capacity, capability, and sustainability of the local not for profit organisation to support the community, particularly during time of drought through the completion of a fit out at the Jericho SES Shed.Jericho$29,120
Queensland Rural Regional and Remote Women’s Network IncorporatedToward 2030 – The Future of RRR Women (Established Wisdom Underpinning Innovative Futures)Reduce volunteer fatigue and build organisation capacity, capability, and sustainability through the development of a strategic plan including organisational collaboration, development, and action planning to secure the future of QRRRWN.Goondiwindi$27,640
St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School BarcaldineThe Next ChapterEnhance participation in education, through purchase of new technology and books for St Joseph’s Primary School, Barcaldine.Barcaldine$31,000
The Rex Monto LimitedThe Rex: Theatre, Gallery and Community HubEnhance community identity with the restoration and development of a theatre, gallery, and community Hub at The Rex.Monto$58,500
Windorah Development BoardPioneers ParkStrengthen economic recovery and renewal through the development of Pioneer Park in Windorah to enhance the tourist experience and showcase local history.Windorah$55,000
Up to $20,000
Alpha District Tourism & Development Association IncorporatedAdditional Resources for our Tivoli Theatre MuseumReduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity through the provision of additional resources including technological equipment, a ladder, display cabinetry and signage for the Alpha ‘Tivoli Theatre’ Museum.Alpha$18,651
Eumamurrin Recreation Association IncorporatedEumamurrin Water InfrastructureReduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of local not-for-profit organisations to provide support to their communities, through the provision of water infrastructure at the Eumamurrin Recreation Reserve and hall.Eumamurrin$17,329
St Therese’s Catholic Primary School Parents & Friends AssociationLight Tower and Electrical Points for our School OvalBuild economic strength and sustainability, contributing to a stronger social fabric and increased resilience and connection to community through purchasing lighting and electrical infrastructure for annual community event.Monto$12,896
Wandoan Arts Council IncorporatedWandoan Arts Council Creative Arts EscapeReduce social isolation by facilitating social cohesion and connection opportunities through the delivery of Wondoan Arts Council Creative Arts Escape in 2021.Wandoan$20,000
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
Up to $60,000
Cleve District Hospital AuxiliaryCleve Community Aged Care BusReduce social isolation and volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity through the provision of a wheelchair friendly bus for Cleve District Hospital services.Cleve$40,000
Copley Progress Association IncorporatedCopley Green Learning CentreReduce social isolation through the development of the Copley Green Learning Centre, a Community Kitchen Garden project.Copley$40,000
Koolunga Primary SchoolOutdoor Learning SpaceEnhance social and educational participation for children disadvantaged by drought through the construction of an outdoor, undercover learning space for the children of Koolunga Primary School.Koolunga$30,000
Truro and District Community Association IncorporatedTown Entry StatementsEnhance economic recovery and renewal through the installation of town entrance statement signage for the Truro township on the Sturt Highway.Truro$49,500
Up to $20,000
Isolated Children’s Parents’ Association (Port Augusta Branch)Bush Kids Honey Support opportunities for social and educational participation and address disadvantage caused by the drought, for children and young people through the provision of beehives for Students of the Air – Port Augusta region.Port Augusta Region$19,186
Rotary Club of Peterborough IncorporatedCommunity Shower & BathroomReduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability and sustainability of the Salvation Army to provide support to their community, particularly where they are playing an increased role during the drought through the installation of showering facilities, in Peterborough.Peterborough$12,000
The Beltana Progress Association IncorporatedCreating a Permanent Exhibition of Flinders Ranges Art in the Beltana Hall as a Tourist AttractionEnhance economic recovery and renewal through the creation of a permanent art exhibition at the historic Beltana Hall.Beltana$12,995
VICTORIA
Up to $20,000
Heyfield RSLExternal CladdingReduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of a local not-for-profit organisations through enhancements at the Heyfield RSL.Heyfield$10,000
Lake Boga Waterski Club IncorporatedLake Boga Waterski Club Kitchen Facility UpgradeReduce social isolation, stimulate the local economy and increase the capacity, capability and sustainability of Lake Boga Water ski Club as they play an increased role during the drought by enhancements to clubhouse facilities.Lake Boga$20,000
Meerlieu Public HallPlanning for the Future – Meerlieu Public HallReduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of Meerlieu Public Hall Committee of Management through the development of designs and documentation for future usage planning and facility enhancements.Meerlieu$17,420
Murrayville and District Liaison Committee IncorporatedPioneer Park Playground Shade StructureReduce social isolation by facilitating social connection through the installation of shade over the Pioneer Park Playground, Murrayville.Murrayville$17,303

[1] 2020 Australian Philanthropy Awards – Best Grant Program

[2] Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology. Drought Rainfall deficiencies and water availability. 7 October 2020. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/2I1PSqA.

Freestone is a small, farming community located west of Brisbane, in Queensland. The town has been hard hit by ongoing drought, job losses and declining mental health and wellbeing among community members.

In 2015, the Freestone Memorial Hall began holding ‘Friday friendlies’ to bring community members together for social catch-ups. These events were particularly important as the drought worsened in 2018, with the economy slowing down due to layoffs. As times got tougher, the attendance at the Friday Friendlies increased.

Because of the importance of this social event, the Freestone Memorial Hall wanted to ensure the space was safe, could host the growing number of visitors, and had the updated facilities needed to ensure everyone could come together for a good time.

Freestone Memorial Hall was awarded a $10,000 grant, funded by the Australian Government, and administered by FRRR as part of the Tackling Tough Times Together Grant Program, to upgrade their facilities, install a data projector and integrated PA system and undergo renovations to fix an unsafe floor.

“Since installations and repairs have been completed, we have run five Friday Friendlies with increasing numbers at each Friendly. We are now averaging 50 people per night with a broad cross section of the community coming together to share their experiences of the month. This has proved particularly important as the drought continues,” Simon Goddard, a volunteer committee member for the Hall, told FRRR.

“We are even getting people back to the Friday Friendlies as they hear of improved facilities and increasing numbers. It is becoming self-perpetuating and has a very promising future.”

The new projector has been a popular addition for many locals, who enjoy getting together to watch live sports and tournaments. 

The grant also allowed the community group to purchase a fridge, which not only keeps their drinks cold for events, but generates some income for the Hall. This modest but sustainable income makes it possible for the community to host bigger and better events together. So far, the Friday Friendlies continues to be a success for the Freestone community, with many looking forward to attending the gathering every week.

When the opportunity arose to provide the locals in Longreach and surrounding areas with leadership development and networking opportunities, Red Ridge Interior jumped at it – particularly, if it could be done in a way that allowed people to participate regardless of their financial means. Three years on, and the program is more successful than ever.

Leadership development is much more than learning how to run a meeting and pitch an idea. It involves building skills in developing positive interpersonal relationships, managing change and conflict, giving and receiving feedback, values-based actions and being open, honest and trusted. These skills are important for everyone, and they allow more individuals to support each other, particularly when times are tough.  

Thanks to a $14,500 grant from the Tackling Tough Times Together program, which was co-funded by Qantas Foundation and Friends of FRRR, Red Ridge Interior was able to ensure that everyone could access leadership development and training and build these important skills. This grant allowed Red Ridge Interior to hire a space, provide catering and pay for a leadership coach and facilitator to come to Longreach for three days to deliver the program. Twenty people participated in the program.

Participants spent three days covering a number of leadership theories and putting them into practice. Some of the topics they covered included Colour Spectrum model of leadership, values in action, understanding change, communication and deep listening, time management, goal setting and more.

Participants also had the opportunity to attend an ‘alumni’ day which brought together participants from the past three years of the program to meet, discuss what they had learnt and the real-world applications. This also gave them opportunities to connect with other leaders in their communities that were experiencing similar challenges and offered opportunities for mentorship.

Participants got a great deal out of the workshops. One said of the experience, “I have learnt about who I am as a leader, where my strengths are and where I need to work harder. I have learnt so much and have gained so much for myself, my family, my work and hopefully my community.” 

Another said: “I learnt about my strengths and weaknesses and knowledge of each individual having their own strengths and weaknesses. Leadership is utilising everyone to achieve.”

When a popular city-based summer school music program made plans to bring the beat to the bush and put on a show alongside it, the whole community of Tenterfield NSW let the rhythm takeover. 

Recently ravaged by drought and fires, the small town was experiencing some hard times. Charitable organisation Hartbeat of the Bush teamed up with the Cuskelly College of Music’s Winter Music School in a bid to provide Tenterfield and the surrounding communities with a brief respite from it all – the result was a week long ‘Beat of the Bush’ festival during the July 2019 holidays.

Dr James Cuskelly has run a Summer School music program in Brisbane for years, but it was his long-held dream to bring the music back to the bush, to his roots. Despite the evidence that incorporating music in a child’s education shows life changing benefits, such as improving literacy, numeracy, confidence, behaviour and wellbeing, 63 percent of primary schools in Australia offer no classroom music. In regional and remote schools, there is limited or no musical and arts based education, and opportunities for children to actively participate as performers and artists, under the mentorship of professionals and in front of an audience, is rare and for some non-existent.

Hartbeat of the Bush supports arts, music and cultural development programs in regional and remote communities. This initiative was designed as a whole of community project, to enable participants to socialise with others from across and beyond their region. In total, around 160 participants attended the Winter School, travelling from Brisbane, the Gold Coast, Toowoomba, Ashford, Texas and Newcastle and lots of other little places in between. 

The program kicked off with the Big Chilly Sing, a day-long singing and song-writing workshop that gave locals a chance to converge and get the toes tapping. This was followed by a range of courses and concerts for students of all ages delivered by more than 50 teachers, many of whom are internationally-acclaimed. 

A range of concerts were also put on by the Winter School music educators themselves, which were attended by 220 people each night. Locals and visitors alike were treated to a folk concert, jazz performances, a chamber music concert, an opera night, a piano concert and of course, the final night culminated in one of the biggest concerts Tenterfield has ever seen. The finale was a rendition of the legendary Peter Allen song Tenterfield Saddler, performed by all of the Winter School attendees, and arranged by Pete Churchill, who led the Jazz studies program.

Musical experiences like this help children develop social skills and build confidence. Children from all over the region who had never met one another, played an instrument nor sung in a choir before this program amazed their family members with the talent and skills they had learnt in just five days. Many of these children are still in contact with each other and cannot wait for the next event.
What’s more, the economic benefits for the town were significant, with cafes, restaurants and retail outlets benefitting from a lot of foot traffic at a time when the drought impact was being deeply felt. A large number of local community groups were involved in some way, from making lunches and morning teas to providing venues for the concerts. 

Hartbeat of the Bush President Ms Helen McCosker said it was a whole of community effort. 

“The whole community was abuzz – even though we had had fires, drought and could no longer drink the town’s water, we had provided the businesses with a little sense of what was normal, something to look forward to and grow for our little country town.”

The $20,000 grant received by Hartbeat of the Bush was funded by the Australian Government through FRRR’s Tackling Tough Times Together program. This covered the costs of running free daily buses within a 100 km radius for commuters from Warwick, Bonshaw, Glen Innes and Tabulum, as well as accommodation at the local Tenterfield Motor Inn for tutors (both overseas and those from Brisbane) and volunteers.

Nearly $1.3 million in grants awarded

21 August 2020: Thirty-six community-led projects that will help tackle the ongoing challenges faced by drought-affected communities across Australia are sharing in nearly $1.3 million in grants, through the Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal’s (FRRR) Tackling Tough Times Together (TTTT) program.

The TTTT program helps local groups in rural, regional and remote communities Australia-wide tackle the effects of the drought by building capacity, reducing social isolation, developing leadership and skills training, improving social and educational participation, and stimulating economic activity.

Rural areas impacted by drought, such as Longreach in Queensland, have used previous TTTT grants to fund community-led projects such as education and training workshops to help drive employment opportunities; run free community events that bring people together to share their experiences; and upgrading community equipment and infrastructure that are used to provide safe places for people to come together to support one another through the ongoing effects of the drought.

Deanne Cavalier, TTTT Program Manager, said that the Tackling Tough Times Together program was specifically designed to help drought-affected communities to build on the strengths and resilience that exist within the community.

“Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, we know local leaders still have ideas about how they can support their community, they just need someone to back their ideas. Thanks to our donor partners, FRRR is able to help local groups to seed and strengthen, adapt and evolve, and innovate and renew their community,” said Ms Cavalier.

“This round of TTTT really showed the impact that COVID-19 is having on the capacity of volunteers, as their focus turns towards their families and concerns of job security. This naturally has had flow-on effects on the capacity of community groups to maintain continuity of services and their ability to maintain momentum on community-focused projects. While this certainly limits resources, we want local groups to know that we are here to support them and will continue to back them as they find ways that they can best support their community,” said Ms Cavalier.

Some of the 36 projects awarded this round include:

  • Sunset Strip Progress Association, NSW – Sunset Strip Boulevard Walk of Fame: Films and Stars of Outback Australia – $142,897 – Support local economic strength and renewal through the construction of the Sunset Strip Boulevard Walk of Fame to increase tourism numbers.
  • Central West Farming Systems Incorporated, NSW – Tapping a natural resource – a rural and regional ‘remote’ workforce – $51,195 – Increase skills and capacity to work remotely through provision of tailored training program for individuals in Central West NSW.
  • Charters Towers Women of the Outback Shed, QLD – Growing Space for Growing Needs – $36,702 – Increase the capacity and build the sustainability of the Charters Towers Women of the Outback Shed through construction of additional space to accommodate increased membership and activity.
  • William Creek Gymkhana Committee, SA – Horsemanship Clinic & Get-Together for Children and the Wider Community – $18,090 – Reduce social isolation and provide an opportunity for social and educational participation through the delivery of a horsemanship clinic and get-together for children and the wider community.
  • Manangatang Improvement Group, VIC – Cooking Up a Storm: Manangatang Hall Kitchen upgrade – $60,000 – Increase capacity to enhance community events at Manangatang Hall, by upgrading the kitchen.
  • Condingup and Districts Recreation Association, WA – Condingup Community Centre Space for Kids – $60,000 – Support opportunities for social connection through construction of a skatepark at the Condingup Recreation Reserve.

Tackling Tough Times Together is possible thanks to the collaborative support of several donors, including the Australian Government which committed $15M to be distributed over three years. Generous contributions have also been made by Pratt Foundation, Stockland CARE Foundation, Paul Ramsay Foundation, The Snow Foundation, Tim Fairfax Family Foundation, Henroth Group and private donors from across the nation.

Applications for the TTTT program are always open and groups in drought-affected areas are encouraged to apply for funding to help their community come together to tackle the drought.

The cut-off dates for future rounds are:

  • 27 August 2020. Outcomes will be advised late November 2020.
  • 22 October 2020. (Note, Stage One for the $150,000 grant tier must be received by 10 September 2020.) Outcomes will be advised late February 2021.

The full list of grant recipients and their projects are below.

Jump to : NSW | QLD | SA / VIC / WA

Organisation

Project

Location

Grant

NEW SOUTH WALES

Up to $150,000

Sunset Strip Progress Association Incorporated

Sunset Strip Boulevard Walk of Fame – Films and Stars of Outback Australia
Support local economic strength and renewal through the construction of the Sunset Strip Boulevard Walk of Fame to increase tourism numbers.

Sunset Strip$142,897

Up to $60,000

Anglican Parish of Braidwood Community Management Committee for the Old Anglican Hall Braidwood

Major Restoration of Old Anglican Hall, Braidwood
Increase access to space for community activities and events through restoration of local historic Hall.

Braidwood$56,591
Central West Farming Systems Incorporated

Tapping a Natural Resource – A Rural and Regional ‘Remote’ Workforce
Increase skills and capacity to work remotely through provision of tailored training program for the community in the Central West of NSW.

Condobolin$51,195
Curban Community Hall
Gilgandra Council

Curban Community Hall Enhancements
Improve local meeting space and increase community capacity through installation of audio-visual equipment and upgrade to outdoor BBQ area.

Curban$33,463
Jerilderie Pre School Kindergarten Incorporated

Jerilderie Preschool Long Day Care Centre Playground
Increase access to locally based childcare services, through support to construct a playground and outdoor place space at the new Jerilderie Long Day Care Centre.

Jerilderie$60,000
Boomi Memorial Hall Committee
Moree Plains Shire Council

Boomi Memorial Hall Upgrade
Increase accessibility and reduced volunteer fatigue through upgrades to the Boomi Memorial Hall.

Boomi$59,549
Northern Gomeroi Aboriginal Corporation

Northern Gomeroi Men’s Shed
Increase social inclusion and activities for local men through purchase of a property for a Men’s Shed.

Boggabilla$52,542
Western Plains Regional Development Incorporated

Broadening Horizons
Provide youth with access to transport to enable them to take part in preschool, work experience, school holiday programs and other extra-curricular activities across the Lachlan Shire through the purchase of a 12-seater bus.

Lake Cargelligo$60,000

Up To $20,000

Coonabarabran Aero Club
Coonabarabran High School Parents and Citizens Association

The Sky is No Limit!
Enhance educational participation for children disadvantaged by drought through the upgrade of the Coonabarabran Aero Club training school flight simulator at Coonabarabran High School.

Coonabarabran$4,705
Coursing Park Tennis and Community Centre Incorporated

Coursing Park Tennis and Community Centre Repair- Stage 2
Reduce volunteer fatigue, increase organisational capacity, and strengthen community cohesion through enhancements at the Coursing Park Tennis and Community Centre.

Coursing Park$7,485
Crescent Head Community Garden Incorporated

Crescent Head Community Garden Construction Phase 2
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of local not-for-profit organisations through the expansion of the Crescent Head community Garden.

Crescent Head$7,220
Grafton Jacaranda Festival Incorporated

Growing the Grafton Jacaranda Festival
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity through the purchase of tables and chairs for the Grafton Jacaranda Festival.

Grafton$16,454
Moulamein Pre School Incorporated

Moulamein (and Wakool) Preschool’s Visit to Altina Wildlife Park
Enhance social and educational participation for the children of Moulamein and Wakool Preschools through an excursion to Altina Wildlife Park.

Moulamein$1,658
Quandialla Bowling Club

Quandialla Bowling Club Air Conditioning Upgrade
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase capacity through the installation of reverse cycle air conditioning at the Quandialla Bowling Club.

Quandialla$19,700
Revamping at The Woolshed Incorporated

Revamping at the Woolshed
Reduce social isolation and develop skills and knowledge through the delivery of the ‘Revamping at the Woolshed’ repurposing workshops.

Lightning Ridge and surrounds$20,000
Breadalbane Hall & Park ULSC 355 Committee
Upper Lachlan Shire Council

Installation of Commercial Dishwasher
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase capacity through the installation of a commercial dishwasher at the Breadalbane Hall.

Breadalbane$5,000

QUEENSLAND

Up to $60,000

Blackall – Tambo Regional Council

Tambo Dam Lights
Increase local tourism numbers and stay length, through installation of an illuminated sculpture attraction at Tambo Dam public space.

Tambo$45,000
Charters Towers Women of the Outback Shed Incorporated

Growing Space for Growing Needs – a New Shed for the Women of the Outback
Increase the capacity and build the sustainability of the Charters Towers Women of the Outback Shed through construction of additional space to accommodate increased membership and activity.

Charters Towers$36,702
Chinchilla Race Club Incorporated

Public Facility Shade Enhancement Project
Increase community comfort at local meeting facility through installation of shade structures at the Chinchilla Race Club.

Chinchilla$60,000
Dalby Welcoming Community Incorporated

Proactive Dalby – Strengthening and Building Resilience of Six Community Groups
Build capacity, support sustainability, and increase resilience of six local community groups in Dalby, through development of marketing and business plans.

Dalby$46,200
Glenore Grove Public Hall Committee Incorporated

Glenore Grove Public Hall – Extension and Improvements Stage 2
Increase community access and participation at community events through construction of accessible toilets and increased storage space.

Glenore Grove$22,089
Kilkivan Veteran’s and Community Men’s Shed Association Incorporated

Kilkivan Veteran’s and Community “Men’s Shed”
Reduce social isolation and increase connectedness through construction of a Men’s Shed facility for the delivery of craft activities.

Kilkivan$55,105
Moonie Sports Club Incorporated

Tim Brown Multipurpose Pavilion
Increase capacity for local Sports Club to deliver community events and activities through construction of a large sheltered outdoor area.

Moonie$54,721

Up To $20,000

Central Queensland University

The Central Highlands Social Enterprise Hub Project
Enhance knowledge, leadership, and skills development in social enterprise activities through the delivery of The Central Highlands Social Enterprise Hub Project.

Emerald$18,320
Granite Belt Art and Craft Trail Incorporated

Granite Belt Art and Craft Trail Open Studios Event 2020
Reduce social isolation and enhance economic renewal and recovery through the delivery of the Granite Belt Art and Craft Trail Open Studios Event 2020.

Stanthorpe$20,000
Hodgson Soldiers Memorial Hall and Recreation Association Incorporated

Restumping of Hodgson Soldiers Memorial Hall
Increase organisational capacity to continue and encourage community events at Hodgson Soldiers Memorial Hall, through the restumping of the floor.

Hodgson$12,000
Warra Progress and Heritage Society Incorporated

Former Haystack School Building (1910-1968) Repair and Repaint Project
Increase accessibility, capacity, and sustainability through refurbishment of the Haystack School House in Warra.

Warra$19,999

SOUTH AUSTRALIA / VICTORIA / WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Up To $60,000

Farina Restoration Group Incorporated

Farina Community Solar & Digital Engagement Project
Increase capacity and sustainability for volunteer run tourist attraction, through installation of solar system for Farina Restoration Group.

Farina, SA$51,672
Riverland Connect Association Incorporated

Paringa Silo Art
Increase local tourism and support the economy through establishing large mural artwork on local silos at drought affected Paringa.

Paringa, SA$60,000
Manangatang Improvement Group Incorporated

Cooking Up a Storm: Manangatang Hall Kitchen Upgrade
Increase capacity to enhance community events at Manangatang Hall, through upgrade of kitchen.

Manangatang, VIC$60,000
Condingup and Districts Recreation Association Incorporated

Condingup Community Centre Space for Kids
Support opportunities for social connection through construction of a skatepark at the Condingup Recreation Reserve.

Condingup, WA$60,000

Up To $20,000

William Creek Gymkhana Committee

William Creek Community Horsemanship Clinic & Get-Together for Children and the Wider Community
Reduce social isolation and provide opportunity for social and educational participation through the delivery of the William Creek Community Horsemanship Clinic & Get-together for children and the wider community.

William Creek, WA$18,090
Bairnsdale Recycling Enterprise Incorporated

Bairnsdale Repair Café (Pilot Project)
Reduce social isolation and increase skills and knowledge through the delivery of a one-year pilot of the Bairnsdale Repair Café.

Bairnsdale, VIC$11,700
Birchip Cropping Group Incorporated

Bolstering Birchip
Support and engage the Birchip community in leadership development and skills training through the ‘Bolstering Birchip’ project.

Birchip, VIC$20,000
Wycheproof and District Preschool Centre Incorporated

Furniture for New Wycheproof Early Learning Centre
Support opportunities for social and educational participation and address disadvantage caused by the drought, for children through upgrading furniture and learning resources at an Early Learning Centre.

Wycheproof, VIC$12,000
Warren Catchments Council

Mapping Community Well-Being and Resilience in a Changing Climate
Support and engage the community in workshops and skills training to build understanding of the changing climate for residents of Manjimup, Walpole, and Pemberton.

Manjimup, WA$3,000

COVID-19 has impacted rural communities in countless ways, with increased vulnerability and disadvantage being felt in many communities grappling with successive setbacks, including drought, bushfire and existing disadvantages exacerbated by imposed restrictions.

This means FRRR’s work is more important than ever, as Australia emerges from and transitions into new ways of working, living and delivering services.

While FRRR staff are still working from home, they are connecting daily with communities across the country. Below are some of the insights from the calls, queries and requests they are receiving day to day.

There have been high levels of caller concern around the mental health of their communities, given COVID follows several natural disaster events. NSW/ACT Program Manager Jacki Dimond says that there are also increased personal stress levels around not being able to deliver on approved grant activities and / or timelines. She has been spending much of her time considering more project variations than usual.

“Callers have reflected much relief for the support of our flexibility and desire to support them through the variations process to identify alternative activities or delivery mechanisms, such as the Gunning Arts Festival going online, or extending or deferring acquittal periods where needed, ” Jacki noted.

Vivienne McCrory, Grants Officer for Victoria, SA and Tasmania, echoes Jacki’s comments noting that bushfire affected communities are asking if programs will be assessed the same way due to COVID-19.

“They are still applying, but not sure if the project will still go ahead as planned due to restrictions and whether it would affect their grant chances. They have mentioned exhaustion and frustration over the flow of events since Christmas (on top of the drought).”

Another common theme is while some groups have the option to take activities online, inconsistent telecommunications access and mixed levels of digital literacy means it’s not a realistic option for some groups.

“For example, I received a phone call recently from the Yinnar Memorial Hall over 60’s Exercise group. We have funded the program for two years and up to 40 people were coming each week. They are now delivering the program via zoom and many elderly members are having issues connecting. The internet is also poor in the area!,” explained Hannah Jakab, who works on FRRR’s disaster recovery programs.

VIC/SA/TAS Program Manager Carlene Egan is seeing increased requests to fund local people to take on recovery coordination roles.

“Bushfire affected communities are taking charge of their own recovery with known and trusted people and ensuring funds are directed to where they identify as most needed.”

From a drought support perspective, Deanne Cavalier is seeing reduced volunteer capacity due to COVID-19.

“Conversations with community groups have identified a decrease in volunteering at this time due to the pandemic, as their focus turns towards their families and concerns of job security and general fatigue. Volunteers are often older and health and safety concerns relating to COVID-19 this naturally has had flow-on effects on the capacity of community groups to maintain continuity of services and their ability to maintain momentum on community-focused projects.”

While it’s no longer on the front pages, drought is still a very real issue in large parts of the country as this map of Queensland shows, and this story from WA. 

“Despite the wetter start to 2020, the long-term accumulated rainfall deficiencies continue in many parts of Australia and with these continued deficiencies over an extended period, drought continues to be prevalent across much of rural Australia and recovery will be a slow process,” explains Deanne. 

Meanwhile, Alli Mudford, Program Manager for the Investing in Rural Community Futures (IRCF) program says that it highlights the importance of building capacity, not just funding ‘things’.

“Building good relationships within each community is a critical foundation for success. The benefits from regular facilitated connections (rather than just providing grants) must not be underestimated and the IRCF evaluation has processes in place to incorporate these learnings.

“We are also seeing that capacity change in the not-for-profit sector crosses generations. Insights show that the younger generation are more than willing to work with and across other not-for-profit groups in the community.”

Rural communities are eternal optimists and innovators and despite the challenges, community groups have been able to adapt their models to keep a source of income, such as offering delivery services, making hand sanitiser or face masks. We are inspired by the growing success of community-led solutions – especially the renewal of local media ownership, which is a reversal of media closure trends. 

The Sunset Strip Village is located on Menindee Lakes in NSW and has experienced severe drought cycles for the past seven years. Without a water supply for the Community Centre Precinct lawns, Landcare Nursery and land restoration sites, the areas turned brown and undesirable.

The psychological and economic impact of the long-lasting drought has led to painful shortfalls for the community, including the tragic death of a much-loved local volunteer. In addition, at least 28 families in the agricultural industry have abandoned the area, with weekend residents quick to follow suit. The result was a drying and demoralised Sunset Strip, with a third of its houses up for sale.

The Sunset Strip Progress Association Inc (SSPAI) is a locally run not-for-profit, co-managing everything from the local pub to the post office. This resilient group of volunteers have tackled drought-related challenges in the community since 2012, and they were not about to give up their sunny strip. SSPAI knew what their village needed in order to not only survive, but grow and thrive as a small rural community – and they were willing to put in the work to make it happen.

The idea was simple: make the area green and prosperity will follow. The project has well-received by the community as it they all wanted to see the Community Centre Precinct flourish, a restoration of Landcare plantations, and an increase in lifestyle, liveability and house sales with new residents.

Thanks to a $19,070 Tackling Tough Times Together grant funded by the Australian Government, the Sunset Strip Progress Association purchased a submersible pump, a 1,000-watt solar panel, a water controller, a pressure solar pump and 3,300-gallon water tank to a create a permanent groundwater source for the 6,000 sqm flourishing community lawn around the Community Centre Precinct.

Since this much-needed investment, the benefits in the whole village have been obvious. The Sunset Strip Village has welcomed three new families and seen an overall renewed positive atmosphere in the community. The Landcare Nursery Team are growing seedlings that will ensure future growth and thriving greenery – making the Village a desirable destination to work and live again.

The Boulia Shire, located in Central West Queensland, has been in drought since April 2013. With a total population of 426, Boulia residents are turning to community groups to stay active and connected.

These not-for-profit groups are relying on events – such as BBQ fundraisers – to sustain their activities. But it’s not easy. Without access to commercial BBQ equipment, fundraising opportunities are limited. Some groups choose to use privately owned BBQ’s, but these are clunky to move, and raise concerns about volunteer safety.

The Boulia Shire Council is the main employer in the area and supports 12 local community groups. To provide better fundraising opportunities across all groups, the Council set a new objective in 2018 – to source a multi-purpose BBQ unit.

The Council receieved a $26,000 grant from the Tackling Tough Times Together program, funded by Tim and Gina Fairfax, to purchase their new Chill’n’Grill BBQ trailer. The trailer included a fridge and safety equipment, which would allow community groups to transport and operate it safely.

Since its arrival in January 2019, the BBQ trailer has been widely used in the Boulia community. It was first fired up for Australia Day celebrations, which was a big hit on all accounts. Later in the year, the Central West Hospital and Health Services used it for its ‘Health & Wellbeing’ visits and for the Man with a Pram’ Father’s Day function. The BBQ trailer quickly became a popular meeting spot at these events, as attendees could gather around it to share a snack, socialise and show support for neighbours experiencing hardship.

“The trailer has made our working times so much more enjoyable,” said one group organiser. “Great resource. Easy to use, very clean and also easy to clean.”

The Boulia Shire Council is proud of its new fundraising equipment. They are committed to covering ongoing costs for the trailer and are confident their local groups will continue to use it. “This is the start of a domino effect,” a Council representative said. “Better experiences for organisers mean a better chance of more activities, events and functions for the community.”

Bendigo, 19 May 2020: Fifty-eight community-led projects that help drought-affected rural, regional and remote Australian communities are sharing in nearly $2 million in grants, through the Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal’s (FRRR) Tackling Tough Times Together (TTTT) program

While COVID-19 and the bushfires have taken centre stage over the past six months, the drought and long-term rainfall deficiencies remain severe across much of the country. Despite the good rainfall earlier in the year, the drought is far from over. Many communities, like those throughout New South Wales and across the Murray-Darling Basin (which runs through Queensland, New South Wales, Australian Capital Territory, Victoria and South Australia), who are experiencing the driest 36-month period on record. In Queensland, 67.4 percent of the state is drought-declared. Other areas affected by extended periods of rainfall shortages include eastern Victoria, eastern and northern Tasmania, eastern South Australia and parts of southwest Western Australia.

FRRR CEO Natalie Egleton says these communities haven’t been forgotten and FRRR is here to help them get through these dry times.

“We know that large parts of the country are still in drought, and coupled with the impacts of COVID-19, and for many the bushfires too, this is a particularly challenging time. Keeping money flowing into rural areas is a priority for FRRR, so that these communities can continue to work at building capacity and long-term resilience,” said Ms Egleton.

TTTT Program Coordinator, Deanne Cavalier, says that Tackling Tough Times Together grants support projects that aim to reduce social isolation, develop leadership and skills training, social and educational participation, stimulate economic activity and build the capacity of local not-for-profit organisations.

“This round of TTTT saw the most applications since the program’s 2018 national expansion. It’s clear that these communities still need help to access the resources they need to support one another through the ongoing effects of the drought. 

“It’s vital to be flexible and support local recovery efforts in a way that meets the needs of each community now, and into the medium to long-term. That’s why we are open to project variations and supporting organisations pivoting and thinking laterally when it comes to their projects and how grant funds are used during COVID-19 restrictions,” said Ms Cavalier.

Some of the 58 projects awarded this round include:

  • Quilpie Cultural Society Incorporated, QLD – Defying the Drought through Creativity – $31,466 – Relieve current stressors of drought and improve community health and social wellbeing through the installation of new resources at the Cultural Society, and the delivery of a variety of art and craft workshops.
  • Kingaroy BaconFest Inc, QLD – Kingaroy BaconFest 2021 – $58,300 – Support fatigued volunteers and reduce social and economic issues by showcasing local industry and produce and highlighting the importance of buying 100 percent Australian pork product.
  • Lions Club of Ulladulla Milton Incorporated, NSW – Farmers at Burrill (FAB) – $17,138 – Support local industries, economy and tourism, and reduce social isolation through the delivery of a local Farmers’ Market that will showcase local producers and encourage tourists to the region.
  • Colbinabbin & District Historical Society, VIC – The Development of Colbinabbin Silo Art Viewing Area – $59,800 – Reinvigorate local community spirit and the economy by developing land adjacent to the Colbinabbin silo art project into parklands featuring a native garden, walking tracks, and a silo viewing platform.
  • Arno Bay Progress Association Incorporated, SA – Tasting Arno – $3,606 – Reduce social isolation and stimulate the local economy by encouraging the broader community to participate in an accessible, low cost, local event.

Tackling Tough Times Together is possible thanks to the collaborative support of a number of donors, including the Australian Government which committed $15M to be distributed over three years. Generous contributions have also been made by NRMA, Pratt Foundation, Stockland CARE Foundation, Paul Ramsay Foundation, The Snow Foundation, Tim Fairfax Family Foundation, Henroth Group and private donors from across the nation.

Applications for the TTTT program are always open and groups in drought-affected areas are encouraged to apply for funding to help their community come together to tackle the drought.

The next cut-off dates for applications to be considered are:

  • 28 May 2020. Outcomes will be advised late August 2020.
  • 27 August 2020. (Note, expressions of interest for the $150,000 tier must be received by 16 July 2020.) Outcomes will be advised late November 2020.

The full list of grant recipients and their projects are below.

Jump to : NSW | QLD | SA | VIC

Organisation

Project

Location

Grant

NEW SOUTH WALES

Up to $60,000

Billimari Public Hall & Recreation Reserve Land Manager

Kitchen in Billimari Hall
Upgrade Billimari Hall kitchen to increase safety and amenity for local community cultural events and meetings.

Billimari

$58,677

Boggabri and Districts Historical Society

Installation of Vinyl Cladding
Increase comfort and reduce ongoing maintenance of Boggabri Men’s Shed and Museum buildings through recladding.

Boggabri

$35,120

Clare Public School Parents and Citizens Association

Sustainable Community Kitchen at Clare Public School
Enhance catering and cooking activities for the community and school students through the construction of a kitchen at Clare Public School.

Clare

$59,730

Community College-Northern Inland Incorporated

Capacity Building for Community Education Futures in the Northern Inland
Increase the capacity and viability of education provider in drought affected areas that provides job ready skills and training.

Barraba

$37,500

Condobolin and District Landcare Management Committee

Recovery Festival
Strengthening local communities by providing a platform to drive economic growth, social cohesion and cultural identity through delivery of a free Festival at Condobolin.

Condobolin

$60,000

Cypress View Lodge Limited

Cypress View Lodge (CVL) Solar Upgrade
Increase viability of Cypress View Lodge through installation of solar system, supporting locals to stay within their community as they age and need more assistance with daily living and health needs.

Coleambally

$59,696

Dunedoo Bowling Club Limited

Air Conditioning Replacement
Increase comfort and amenity of meeting area in drought affected community through air conditioning upgrade at Dunedoo Bowling Club.

Dunedoo

$34,100

Growmolong Incorporated

“The Molong Story” Mural Artworks
Increase economic growth through attracting tourists to view silo and tank art at Molong.

Molong

$60,000

Guyra Adult Learning Association Incorporated

The Guyra Gazette Lifeline
Increased capacity to produce local newspaper to support the community to; maintain strong connections; raise awareness of local events and activities; encourage social interaction; and inform community of local issues during a period of drought.

Guyra

$40,422

Gwymac Incorporated

Community Planting Bees – For a healthy and Connected Inverell Region
Reduce social isolation and increase community connectedness through redevelopment of local community hub, Inverell Community Garden.

Inverell

$56,177

Hartbeat of the Bush Incorporated

Beat of The Bush Festival 2020
Reduce social isolation and support opportunities for educational participation for children and young people through the delivery of the Beat of The Bush Festival in Tenterfield.

Tenterfield

$55,000

Manilla Community Renewable Energy Incorporated

Renewable Manilla
Increase social connections and provide activities that support learning at the Renewable Manilla Festival.

Manilla

$27,500

Mungindi Community Preschool Incorporated

Optimal Start for Parched Children
Continued delivery of early childhood education regardless of low enrolments in Mungindi through support for program costs. 

Mungindi

$60,000

South West Arts Incorporated

Youth Community Radio Station
Enhance leadership development and skills training opportunities for young people of Deniliquin and surrounds through the creation of the Youth Community Radio Station.

Deniliquin

$28,000

UCA – Greenthorpe

Going To Print
Increase opportunities for the community to connect, support each other and express themselves through the arts.

Greenethorpe

$57,950

Up to $20,000

Age of Fishes Museum Incorporated

Three Fossil Stands for the Age of Fishes Museum
Encourage local tourism and enhance educational opportunity through the provision of three fossil display stands at the Age of Fishes Museum, Canowindra.

Canowindra

$7,217

Borah Creek Public Hall Land Manager

Solar Panels to the Borah Creek Hall
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity through the installation of solar power to the Borah Creek Hall.

Rocky Glen

$7,954

Delungra Public School

Exploring the Ocean Landscape
Enhance social and educational participation for children disadvantaged through drought by the delivery of a weeklong excursion for students of Delungra and Gilgai Public Schools to Lake Ainsworth.

Delungra

$20,000

Hope Bathurst Incorporated

Upgrade of Hopecare Café Kitchen
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity through the upgrade to the Hopecare Café Kitchen.

Bathurst

$16,900

Lions Club of Ulladulla Milton Incorporated

Farmers At Burrill (FAB)
Enhance economic recovery and renewal through the development and delivery of the Farmers at Burrill (FAB) Farmers Market as a pilot market over the 2020/2021 Summer.

Burrill Lake

$10,210

Mungery Recreation Reserve Land Manager

Mungery Skillion
Enhance and repair local meeting place that supports the delivery of community events and activities that increase local connectedness and reduce isolation.

Mungery

$20,000

Narrabri Shire Community Radio Incorporated

Fit Out of a New Studio
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity through the fit out of a second radio studio at Narrabri Shire Community Radio.

Narrabri

$11,000

Scout Association of Australia First Dubbo Scout Group

Water Tanks for Hall
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity through the installation of water tanks at the First Dubbo Scout Group Hall.

Dubbo

$4,619

Tibooburra & District Progress Association

Outback Lock-Up
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity through the provision of two shipping containers at the community Albert Hall and Cemetery.

Tibooburra

$10,500

QUEENSLAND

Up to $60,000

Balonne Shire Council

Bollon Park and Riverland Revitalisation
Upgrade local parklands through installation of new seating, lighting and irrigation, to encourage social connection and enhance local events and activities.

Bollon

$60,000

Boulia Golf Club Incorporated

Rejuventation of Boulia Golf Club – The Hub of the Shire
Improve and repair Boulia Golf Club to encourage community connectedness and reduce social isolation during period of drought.

Boulia

$60,000

Centre For Rural and Regional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Limited

Tucka-Time Program – Fruit and Vegetable Box Addition
Increase access to fresh fruit and improve nutrition for aboriginal primary students in the Gladstone Region.

Gladstone

$37,500

Goondiwindi Pastoral and Agricultural Society

“Putting Rubbish in its Place, With a Hop, Skip and Dump”
Increase the capacity of volunteers to deliver events and activities that support economic and social benefits for the drought affected community of Goondiwindi.

Goondiwindi

$47,024

Junction View Hall Association Incorporated

Junction View Hall Upgrade
Continued access to Junction View Hall through roof repair and external painting, allowing locals to connect and support each other at locally driven activities.

Junction View

$52,146

Kingaroy BaconFest Incorporated

Kingaroy BaconFest 2020
Increase capacity of Festival Committee through support and infrastructure for Kingaroy BaconFest event delivery.

Kingaroy

$58,300

Lockyer Multicultural Association Incorporated

Connecting and Empowering the Lockyer Valley Community Through Local Produce
Improved use of local produce through training opportunities for businesses and the wider community in the Lockyer Valley.

Gatton

$59,200

Monto Magic Tourism Action Group Incorporated

Silo Mural – Revitalisation of Monto
Support local economic recovery and renewal through increased tourism through the painting of four grain silos at Monto.

Monto

$60,000

Quilpie Cultural Society Incorporated

Defying the Drought Through Creativity
Enhance opportunities to participate in creative activities for the Quilpie community through the purchase of resources and the delivery of art workshops.

Quilpie

$31,466

Red Ridge (Interior Queensland) Limited
Channel Country Ladies Day Committee

Building Resilience in Isolated Outback Women Through the Channel Country Ladies Day
Reduce social isolation and enhance coping skills for women in Western Queensland through delivery of the Channel Country Ladies Day 2020.

Quilpie

$55,000

South Burnett Woodcrafters Incorporated

SBW Workshop Development
Increased space for members of the community to interact with others in a supportive and activity driven environment, through fit out of the new South Burnett Woodcrafters building.

Kingaroy

$59,757

UCA – Longreach Congregation

Kitchen Renovation in Edgely Hall
Increase function and expand capacity of local meeting space through kitchen upgrade at Longreach UCA Hall.

Longreach

$57,392

Yelarbon Primary P&C Association

Greener Fields
Reduce the dust and dirt through upgrade of place space at Yelarbon Primary School supporting social and educational participation and address disadvantage for children and young people.

Yelarbon

$45,000

Up to $20,000

Allora Community Circle

Keeping Allora’s Spirit Alive
Enhance community cohesion and reduce social isolation through the delivery of two community events in Allora.

Southern Downs Region

$19,987

Alpha Amateur Swimming Club

Outback Drowning Prevention Program
Enhance opportunity for social and educational participation and address disadvantage for young people caused by drought through the delivery of an 8 week swimming safety program in Alpha.

Alpha

$20,000

Ballyneety Rodeo Club Incorporated

Ballyneety Rodeo Campdraft & Gymkhana
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity through the purchase of 20 tables and 50 chairs for the Aramac community.

Aramac

$2,430

Thallon Progress Association Incorporated

Protecting our Future
Reduce social isolation through the installation of a permanent shade structure over the iconic “William the Wombat” playground sculpture in Thallon.

Thallon

$16,000

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Up to $60,000

Greenock Institute Management Committee Incorporated

Greenock Institute Kitchen Renewal
Upgrade to the kitchen at Greenock Institute to enhance community events and functions with catering.

Greenock

$26,390

Lucky Bay Shackowners Association

Laughter at Lucky Bay
Support a stronger social fabric and enhanced wellbeing through the installation of a playground at Lucky Bay foreshore.

Lucky Bay

$51,597

Parachilna Community Association Incorporated

Parachilna Community Association Airstrip
Increase visitation and economic benefits, and access to services such as the Flying Doctor through construction of an airstrip at remote Parachilna.

Parachilna

$60,000

Port Vincent Progress Association Incorporated

Port Vincent Water Tower Mural Project
Increase tourism and economic benefits for the Port Vincent community through creation of an art installation on 20 metre water tank.

Port Vincent

$54,500

Up to $20,000

Arno Bay Progress Association Incorporated

Tasting Arno
Reduce social isolation through the delivery of the Tasting Arno event.