Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal

In north west Queensland, there is a town called Winton. For the last seven years the town has battled the worst drought they have ever seen. To make matters worse, flooding in early 2020 ravaged the town even further, with the loss of thousands of livestock and damage to much of the surrounding area. This kind of devastation, understandably, created immense financial stress and anxiety for the residents and businesses of Winton.

To lift community spirits, the Diamantina Rodeo and Campdraft Association (DRCA) wanted to hold their annual Campdraft, an event where horse and rider combine to work cattle, but with financial pressures, it was touch and go. With the help of a $20,000 Tackling Tough Times Together (TTTT) grant, they were able to make it a reality. The three-day event brought together crowds from surrounding towns to watch and compete in the Draft in a show of resilience and support for the local businesses of Winton.

The Draft provided a rare opportunity for families and friends to come together to enjoy a night of sport, food and music – a welcome distraction from the grief caused by the last few years. 

The funding covered the major costs for the event, including complying with regulations such as having an ambulance presence, as well as the costs to keep all animals safe and happy. Additionally, the DRCA organised DJs and extra entertainment for attendees over the three days. 

The success of the annual Draft means the DRCA will be in a better situation when it comes time to organise the next event. A committee member said:

“Without this funding we would not have been able to run our annual event, so this was a great achievement not only for our organisation but the whole community.”

In this quarter’s update for FRRR’s donor partners, read about:

  • Grants in Action: Sitting together and speaking up in WA’s mid-west
  • Partnering Opportunity – Building resilience to drought
  • Donor Spotlight: Thankful4Farmers
  • Insights from the bush
  • Community Partner Spotlight: Foundation Barossa
  • Our progress, with your support

FRRR is delighted to note that the Future Drought Fund’s Drought Resilience Leaders Program was launched today by Minister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency Management, David Littleproud.

The program will see the implementation of 12 Leadership cohorts across Australia (supporting around 500 participants), a mentoring program delivered in partnership with the National Farmers Federation, and the delivery of 225 Community Extension Grants (CEG’s, up to $4k) for participants to activate locally led initiatives around drought resilience.

FRRR looks forward to partnering with the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation, Australian Government and other collaborative partners in the roll-out of this program.

Read the full announcement here: https://rural-leaders.org.au/building-leadership-resilience-for-the-future/

27 locally-led projects funded

Rural communities across Australia are sharing in $1,060,404 in grants for 27 projects that will help them access the resources they need to tackle the ongoing effects of the Big Dry thanks to FRRR’s award-winning grants program[1], Tackling Tough Times Together (TTTT).

Rural communities still tackling drought
William Creek Gymkhana Committee – TTTT Round 17 grant recipient

While water storage levels in the northern Murray-Darling Basin and northern Australia have improved, parts of south east Queensland and southern Western Australia still face serious or severe rainfall deficiencies[2]. Although other areas and states have had some rain, recovery from drought requires at least 18 months of average to above average rainfall. So much of the country continues to need support to tackle the impacts of the prolonged dry.

The 27 funded projects will help rural communities across Australia, from Charleville in Queensland, Moulamein in New South Wales, Keith in South Australia, to Manjimup in Western Australia, strengthen social connections, boost economic recovery, and build community and organisational capacity and disaster resilience.

Nina O’Brien, FRRR’s Disaster Resilience and Recovery Lead, said that on top of the effects of the drought, the ongoing impacts of the pandemic has seen volunteer fatigue emerge as a key priority in many places.

“For those areas still in drought, volunteers and local groups have had to find ways to sustain and engage the community,” Ms O’Brien explained.

“Maintaining this optimism and drive is no small feat, and we are pleased to be able to support the places and the people that are working to make their community thrive amidst the complexities of drought and the pandemic.

This includes groups like the Bundaleer Forest Community Areas Association in Jamestown, South Australia, who will be able to support their volunteers and boost economic sustainability by upgrading infrastructure and purchasing new equipment. The funding will provide equipment and storage areas needed to maintain the Maple and Pine event centre. The Bundaleer Forest project will provide strong, genuine and ongoing economic benefit, regardless of seasonal conditions, making Jamestown a more attractive place to live, work and play.

In New South Wales, Moulamein Community Development Incorporated has developed an inspiring project that will encourage tourism activity to the area through the restoration of the Werai Horse Stables and Moolpa Blacksmith shop in the Moulamein Heritage Village. The primarily volunteer-run organisation has been awarded a $149,930 grant for their initiative, which will boost the region’s economic recovery and build community wellbeing.

Some of the 27 projects awarded this round include:

  • Monaro Farming Systems CMC Incorporated, NSW – Building Resilient Relationships for Farmers – $29,610 – Help locals stay informed and connected through the delivery of workshops in the Monaro region.
  • Charleville & District Cultural Association Inc, QLD – Charleville Creative Lane 2021 – $20,000 – Encourage more local involvement in the community by delivering up to 30 creative arts workshops in Charleville.
  • Back to the Bush Festival Incorporated, QLD – Miles Back to the Bush Festival – It is the people that make it – $23,452 – Support opportunities for social and educational participation and address disadvantage caused by the drought, for children and young people of Miles, QLD through the delivery of the Back to the Bush Festival in September 2021.
  • Cadell Community and Tourist Association, SA – Cadell Op-Shop Amenities Block – $11,000 – Support volunteers at the community owned and operated Cadell Op-Shop by installing running water and an onsite toilet.
  • Shire of Manjimup, WA – Youth Engage and Empower Project – $60,000 – Support opportunities for social and educational participation through employment of a Project Facilitator to build local youth resilience and establish a youth council for the Shire of Manjimup.

Applications for the TTTT program are always open and groups in drought-affected areas are encouraged to apply for funding to help their community come together to tackle the drought. Grants are available for a broad range of grassroots, community-led initiatives that directly and clearly benefit local communities.

The cut-off dates for the next round of TTTT are:

  • 24 August 2021. (Note: Stage One for the $150,000 grant tier must be received by 12 August). Outcomes will be advised late November 2021.

Tackling Tough Times Together is possible thanks to the collaborative support of several donors, including the Australian Government which committed $15M to be distributed over three years. Generous contributions have also been made by Pratt Foundation, Stockland CARE Foundation, Paul Ramsay Foundation, The Snow Foundation, Tim Fairfax Family Foundation, Henroth Group and private donors from across the nation. To join these donors, and support grants like this through FRRR, you can make a tax-deductible donation here.

More information on the Tackling Tough Times Together grant program is available here.

The full list of grant recipients and their projects are below.

Jump to: NSW | QLD | SA | WA

OrganisationProjectLocationGrant
NEW SOUTH WALES
Up to $150,000
Moulamein Community Development IncorporatedMoulamein Heritage Village Stage Two
Enhance economic recovery and renewal through the restoration of the Werai Horse Stables and Moolpa Blacksmith shop in the Moulamein Heritage Village.
Moulamein$149,930
Up to $60,000
Guyra Garden Club Guyra Spring Flower Festival 2021 - Memorial Avenue & Mandala Garden
Boost and strengthen the local economy with the Guyra Spring Flower Festival 2021 including a Memorial Avenue and Mandala Garden to honour service people.
Guyra$50,000
Monaro Farming Systems CMC IncorporatedBuilding Resilient Relationships for Farmers
Help locals stay informed and connected through the delivery of Building Resilient Relationships for Farmers workshops in the Monaro region.
Cooma$29,610
Up to $20,000
Dunoon Men's Shed IncorporatedModelling the Renewable Energy Lifestyle
Support climate resilience and sustainability of the Dunoon Men’s Shed by installing solar power with a battery back-up system.
Dunoon$20,000
Crescent Head Community Hall CommitteeInterior Refurbishment of Crescent Head Community Hall
Encourage better use of the community hall by repairing and restoring the interior to make the community space more comfortable and welcoming.
Crescent Head$14,133
Macleay Choristers IncorporatedMacleay Choristers Piano Grant
Enhance cultural activities that increase local connectedness, through purchase of a piano for local choir and wider community.
Kempsey$10,790
QUEENSLAND
Up to $60,000
Texas P-10 State School Parents and Citizens AssociationTexas State School Middle School Playground Facility
Encourage children’s learning and development through play by installing play equipment for grades 3-6.
Texas$60,000
South Burnett Mountain Bike Club IncorporatedGordonbrook Dam Mountain Bike Park
Support eco-tourism opportunities to strengthen the local economy through construction of a mountain bike track at Kingaroy.
Kingaroy$49,654
Friends of the Gallery
Booringa Action Group Incorporated
Booringa Fire and Water Festival
Boost and strengthen the local economy with the Fire and Water Festival.
Mitchell$41,653
Swan Creek School of Arts Committee IncorporationSwan Creek Hall Floor Replacement
Increase safety and amenity at local meeting space, through upgrading the flooring at Swan Creek Hall.
Swan Creek $41,501
Thallon Progress Association IncorporatedSculptures in the Scrub - Thallon Art History Trail
Boost and strengthen the local economy and increase connection to place through development of a sculpture trail in Thallon.
Thallon$35,876
Roughlie Community Centre IncorporatedShaded Outdoor Area
Increase local capacity to support community activities and connectedness, through construction of an outdoor meeting area at Roughlie Community Centre.
Roma$34,000
Amiens History Association IncorporatedMulti-function Solar Shed and Access Pathways
Boost and strengthen the organisation’s capacity and sustainability by constructing a multi-purpose shed with solar panels at the Amiens Legacy Centre.
Amiens$32,659
Back to the Bush Festival IncorporatedMiles Back to the Bush Festival – It’s the People that Make it
Support opportunities for social and educational participation and address disadvantage caused by the drought, for children and young people of Miles, QLD through the delivery of the Back to the Bush Festival in September 2021.
Miles$23,452
Up to $20,000
Charleville & District Cultural Association IncorporatedCharleville Creative Lane 2021
Encourage more local involvement in the community by delivering up to 30 creative arts workshops in Charleville.
Charleville$20,000
Farm 2 Fork Collective IncorporatedFuture Proofing the Farm 2 Fork Collective
Boost and strengthen organisation and volunteer capacity with professional development to ensure growth and sustainability.
Kingaroy$19,475
Killarney Bowls Club IncorporatedPurchase New Kitchen Appliances
Improve volunteer vitality and organisational resilience by replacing appliances at the Killarney Bowls Club.
Killarney$16,100
C&K Middlemount Community Childcare Centre
The Creche and Kindergarten Association Limited
C&K Middlemount’s Solar-wise Childcare Project
Support climate resilience and the sustainability of the community childcare centre through the installation of solar panels.
Middlemount$9,626
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
Up to $60,000
Milang & District Historical Society IncorporatedThe Port Milang Museum Upgrade
Increase volunteer safety and comfort at Milang Museum and Men's Shed, through building repairs.
Milang$57,090
Bundaleer Forest Community Areas Association IncorporatedStorage and Equipment for Efficient and Sustainable Volunteer Management of Newly Opened Event Centre Maple & Pine, Bundaleer, SA
Reduce volunteer fatigue and boost the sustainability of the Maple and Pine community centre through purchase of equipment.
Jamestown$56,210
Keith Golf Club IncorporatedKeith Golf Club Renovations - Stage 2
Improve the comfort, amenity and function of the local community meeting area, through upgrade to Keith Golf Club building.
Keith$52,883
Bute 2000 Onwards Committee
Barunga West Council
Bute's "Beaut" Silo Art Project
Boost and strengthen the local economy through silo art at Bute.
Bute$49,915
Riverland Connect Association Enhancement of Paringa Silo Art
Enhance the silo art attraction at Paringa, through installation of lighting and sheds for shelter.
Paringa$36,645
Up to $20,000
Purnong District Hall IncorporatedUnderpinning
Grow community resilience and secure the future of the Purnong District Hall for generations with infrastructure works.
Purnong$18,200
Cadell Community and Tourist AssociationCadell Op-Shop Amenities Block
Support volunteers at the community owned and operated Cadell Op-Shop by installing running water and an onsite toilet.
Cadell$11,000
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Up to $60,000
Shire of ManjimupYouth Engage and Empower Project
Support opportunities for social and educational participation through employment of a Project Facilitator to build local youth resilience and establish a youth council for the Shire of Manjimup.
Manjimup$60,000
The Moore Catchment Council (Inc)Building a BIG Carnaby's Black Cockatoo Sculpture in Moora
Enhance local tourism and diversify economic opportunities at Moora, through construction of large sculpture featuring the Carnaby Black Cockatoo.
Moora$60,000

[1] 2020 Australian Philanthropy Awards – Best Grant Program

[2] Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology. Drought Rainfall deficiencies and water availability. 10 May 2020. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/2I1PSqA.

Woolomin is a rural village located in North West slopes of NSW. It’s home to just 279 residents, including many families, but there is no public playground for the children to play at.

Many young families in Woolomin have limited capacity to travel to larger centres for sport and recreation, due to the costs associated and lack of public transport. Children were increasingly using the streets to play in, and this was problematic, with the main road through the centre of town being quite busy with traffic (connecting Tamworth to popular tourist destinations including Nundle and Chaffey Dam).

It was clear that developing a safe place for children to play, and along the way helping to combat social isolation in the village, was a community priority.

Tamworth Regional Council, in partnership with the Woolomin Recreation Reserve Committee (WRRC), took on the challenge, working together to come up with a plan that would make their community stronger and more socially connected. 

Consisting of 12 members, supported by an additional 10 passionate volunteers, WRRC was established in 2004 to develop Woolomin Recreation Reserve as an important hub to the Village, and they’ve since made a range of improvements for the community – the playground project was next.

The two organisations applied for FRRR’s Tackling Tough Times Together program, and were thrilled to hear that they had received a $59,000 grant, thanks to generous funding by the Australian Governement and Stockland CARE Foundation. At the time of applying, Woolomin was fully drought-declared.

With the new funding to install a playground at the local recreation reserve, they got to work, but not before consulting with those who would benefit most from the project – the local kids.

Woolomin Public School children played an integral part in designing the play area through their input into the type of equipment that would be installed. They actually started drawing up plans in mid 2018! The children’s requests were limited only by their imagination, and can be read in their letters to council here. While not every request was possible (zip lines, merry-go-rounds, monorail, a fairy floss fountain, mango trees, skate park and a Beyblade stadium were all put forward, as well as more traditional playground equipment!) it was clear that they put a lot of thought into their submissions.

One student wrote:

“In the park I would like to see a lots of trees, plants, shade shelters, seating, a bike rack and things that can help the environment.”

The final design includes components which encourage fine-motor skill play, gross-motor skill play and imaginative play as well as promoting an accessible and inclusive space for children of all abilities.

There’s nothing stopping these creative Woolomin kids from adding to the playground in the future so that it’s all they desire. For the meantime, it’s clear from their letters that it will bring important benefits.

“A park in Woolomin would make me very happy because it would give me a place to go to calm down and stuff.”

“Thank you for building in Woolomin as it will help the kids be active.”

“Thankyou if you build it. It will be so much fun and help people meet others.”

A number of visitors to the community are accessing the playground, and the local community feedback is very positive. A neighbouring land holder commented that it is “just lovely to hear the children laughing and having fun, I have seen mum reading the paper in the sun and the children on the play equipment.”

The playground has created the opportunity to draw family and community members to a central spot in their community, to spend time together, play and provide a sense of connection and wellbeing.

Well done Woolomin!

About 70 km north of Roma, in Queensland’s Maranoa district, there is a crossroad, a place that most people pass by. It’s not a barren area – it has its own sense of beauty, but it is not an easy place to live either. It’s known as Roughlie.

In the five years from 2014, this small part of the world experienced pretty much everything the elements could throw at it. They endured floods, fires, severe drought conditions and decreasing commodity prices. But they are a resilient bunch of people.

During these hardships, two farmers – a husband and wife team – offered a parcel of their land to the community for the purpose of establishing a not-for-profit community centre.

As Lexene Spreadborough, Treasurer of Roughlie Community Centre explains, they saw a need to have a place where the community could come together for physical, emotional and mental wellbeing through social interaction and community involvement.

“[We needed] a place for members of our community and district to come together for mental and moral support is vital during droughts. A community space allows drought-affected farmers and graziers to support each other – improving community connectivity and in turn build a stronger community.

“The Roughlie Community Centre Inc. was established in July 2014, and by the October we had 40 members forming the working committee. All members and the community were volunteers with no paid staff.

TTTTRoughlie Community Centre

“Our vision was to have a centre to be used for social functions, sporting and recreational activities and to provide a venue for industry groups for workshops, seminars and field days. But we needed somewhere to meet, as there was no community meeting place in our district,” said Ms Spreadborough.

The ‘It started with a Shed’ project was borne, as part of the first stage in their shared vision.

“We received a $9,990 grant through FRRR’s Tackling Tough Times Together program to build a Shed for the community to come together to fundraise and plan the centre. The money, which we know came from the Tim Fairfax Family Foundation, was a catalyst for further funds, with substantial additional donations being made to connect the power, install a rain tank, a BBQ and stainless-steel benches. Another successful application to the Maranoa Regional Council’s ‘Community Grant’ program provided half the cost of fencing of the land, with the remainder being funded by members and residents. And we’ve gone on from there, since securing other grants and we now have a new Community Centre.

“The Shed – the first building on our land – started it all. It’s led to families coming together to connect with other members of our district. We have held card afternoons, club meetings, theme nights and other events. Before this some people had very little social interaction.”

Kara Spreadborough works as a Clinical Nurse Consultant at the local hospital. She has a young family, and to her, the Shed offers a special place of connection and sense of community.

“[In my role], I see the importance of that interaction and connection for the community, so I provided a letter of support just to say that working in the outback for the last 8 years, I’ve seen the importance of coming together as a community and the mental health aspect of it. Just sharing stories, sharing a cuppa, really does help people process things, because there’s that aspect of people being a bit more lonely, a bit more isolated in the bush.

“The whole process of applying for the grant was seamless. Although these things seem daunting, once you get going and talking to people… And the fact that we got what we asked for, we were blown away, but we were so appreciative. Doing this for the community, people would stop us in the street and say how amazing it was that we got this building, because it is amazing.”

Lexene Spreadborough said that while they’ve only just started using it, they have had a lot of people enquiring about it now, but mostly for workshops, seminars, information and industry-related training days.

“It’s also used socially for anyone in the district, sometimes we have a Friday night get together here, we have our meetings here, rural fire brigades have their meetings here, and Anglicare has a monthly children’s playgroup,” she said.

President of the Roughlie Community Center, John Frith, said, “I think it’s a real positive to the area to bring people together more regularly, and the guys obviously share similar challenges and successes. They can get together more regularly than they otherwise would with this facility here, which I think is important on two fronts; socially, and the potential to bring industry forums to the actual doorstep.”

And while the finishing touches to the Community Centre were only made in December 2020, the venue has already hosted a number of community gatherings, and a workshop is scheduled in July for community members to gain an understanding of soil carbon sequestration practices to mitigate climate change and move towards better land management and agricultural practices.

The impact of investing in resilience

Hovells Creek Landcare (HCL), NSW received an FRRR grant to support a series of workshops to increase land management knowledge and strategies, at the same time as strengthening community and social connections and wellbeing.

When drought strikes, the toll of the dry land can have an overwhelming impact on a farmer’s livelihood, family and community.

The group has been running workshops on drought and land, and resource management with expert speakers, using a $19,554 Tackling Tough Times Together grant received in the thick of the drought.

These workshops provided Landcare members with the latest thinking and resources for drought management, as well as a social interaction opportunity. They aimed to support farmers and community members to feel that they are doing their best for their livestock, their landscape, their families and themselves – to plan for the future, as much as the present.

To assist with volunteer fatigue impacting the HCL during the demanding drought, the grant also helped to fund a Coordinator to manage the workshops. The Coordinator organised expert speakers, promoted the events and arranged the venues and catering. The grant also funded any expert guest fees and travel expenses.

Experts spoke on topics ranging from managing mental health, to soil and moisture monitoring, and livestock feeding strategies.

Around 50 to 70 people participated, including a mix of Landcare members and local landholders, but with sessions shared online and in newsletters and local media, the insights were shared widely. The participants varied in terms of their level of knowledge and understanding of climate change and its impacts. They all had differing community and individual pressures as a result of the ongoing drought, and were presented with a suite of options to help them respond.

According to one of the former committee members, the workshops had the following impacts on participants: an increase in wellbeing, knowledge and capacity – with much greater awareness of climate change scenarios and importantly the likely local impacts. They learnt about tools, technologies and improved land management practices to effectively, sustainably and productively manage natural resources and adapt to significant changes in climate.

As a result of FRRR’s support for the project, funded by the Stockland CARE Foundation, HCL was able to secure more funding for a soil moisture probe in the Valley to enable producers to access real time moisture levels, rainfall and soil temperature data. This probe will help with plant management and maximise growth opportunities both now and into the future.

29 projects funded to support drought-impacted communities

FRRR has awarded $1,264,396 in grants to 29 projects that will support communities across the country that are experiencing prolonged rainfall shortages. The funding is through its award-winning grants program[1], Tackling Tough Times Together (TTTT).

Tackling Tough Times Together
Quilpie Outback Fringe Festival

The grants will help drought-impacted regions access the resources needed to bring people together, so they can feel connected and supported. These places, like many parts of remote, rural and regional Australia, continue to face the real and persistent challenges caused by Australia’s Big Dry. Despite rainfall across some areas, these extended dry periods and long-term rainfall deficits may continue for some time.[2]

Nina O’Brien, FRRR’s Disaster Resilience and Recovery Lead, said that the TTTT program encourages communities experiencing the Big Dry to take the lead in their recovery and renewal.

Many places facing long-term rainfall shortages have seen their local economy hit. These resilient communities are finding ways to strengthen their economy and encourage local spending and tourism. For Orroroo Carrieton, the District Council is boosting the local economy by developing the Black Rock Wool Press Rotunda as a local attraction. The Rotunda will showcase local historic artifacts including the restored Black Rock Wool Press.

“Other places like Washpool in South Australia and Cecil Plains in Queensland, are renewing their regions by upgrading local facilities to give people a place where they can come together in safety and comfort.

“We are delighted to be able to award these grants to help turn local ideas into reality. We know it’s challenging to get these projects off the ground in the midst of a pandemic, especially when many are dealing with reduced local fundraising capacity, and fatigued volunteers.

“We want people experiencing drought to know that there is still funding available. TTTT is a flexible grant program specifically designed to support communities as they move to recovery. Our team will work with you to help make your project happen, even if it might look a bit different to what you’d initially planned, in light of COVID-19,” Ms O’Brien explained.

Some of the 29 projects awarded this round include:

  • District Council of Orroroo Carrieton, SA – Black Rock Wool Press Rotunda – $143,252 – Boost local economy and tourism opportunities by supporting the development of the Black Rock Wool Press Rotunda to showcase local historical artefacts including the restored Black Rock Wool Press.
  • ABC Foundation Limited, WA – AWRAE: Aboriginal Women’s Research Assistant & Evaluation Training Project – $60,000 – Create opportunities for Indigenous women of Carnarvon and surrounds to develop leadership skills by training them to research and evaluate projects delivered in Indigenous communities.
  • Gooloogong Historical Society Incorporated, NSW – Stage 1 – Restoration and revitalisation of Gooloogong’s meeting place – $59,752 – Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase community connections and sense of place by restoring the Gooloogong Clubhouse to house the Gooloogong Historical Society.
  • Drillham Primary Parents and Citizens Association, QLD – Along the Garden Path – $13,000 – Reduce social isolation and encourage people to come together and connect through a two-day creative arts workshop program.
  • Wheatbelt Business Network Incorporated, WA – Accredited Mental Health First Aid Training in the Wheatbelt – $26,300 – Develop community leaders’ skills and training to provide support for their communities by engaging them in Mental Health First Aid training.

Applications for the TTTT program are always open and groups in drought-affected areas are encouraged to apply for funding to help their community come together to tackle the drought. Grants are available for a broad range of grassroots, community-led initiatives that directly and clearly benefit local communities.

The cut-off dates for future rounds are:

  • 24 May 2021. Outcomes will be advised late August 2021. (Note: Stage One for the $150,000 grant tier must be received by 13 April). Outcomes will be advised late November 2021.
  • 24 August 2021. (Note: Stage One for the $150,000 grant tier must be received by 12 August). Outcomes will be advised late November 2021.

Tackling Tough Times Together is possible thanks to the collaborative support of several donors, including the Australian Government which committed $15M to be distributed over three years. Generous contributions have also been made by Pratt Foundation, Stockland CARE Foundation, Paul Ramsay Foundation, The Snow Foundation, Tim Fairfax Family Foundation, Henroth Group and private donors from across the nation.

To support grants like this through FRRR, make a tax deductible donation here.

The full list of grant recipients and their projects are below.

Jump to: SA | NSW | QLD | VIC | WA

Organisation

Project

Location

Grant

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Up to $150,000

District Council of Orroroo Carrieton Black Rock Wool Press Rotunda
Enhance economic recovery and renewal through the development of the Black Rock Wool Press Rotunda showcasing local historical artifacts including the restored Black Rock Wool Press.
Orroroo $143,252
Wilmington Progress Society Incorporated Wilmington Community Multipurpose Gym Facility Project
Reduce social isolation by facilitating strong social cohesion and connections and increase organisational capacity through the construction of a multipurpose community facility.
Wilmington $108,367

Up to $60,000

Auburn Southern Gateway Committee
Auburn Community Development Committee
Auburn Southern Gateway
Enhance economic recovery and renewal through the installation of town entrance statement signage for the Auburn township in the South Australia Clare Valley.
Auburn $43,826
Washpool Hall Management Committee
Spalding District Incorporated
Washpool Hall Kitchen and Rear Lobby Revitalisation
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity of the Washpool Hall through the upgrade of the kitchen and rear lobby area.
Washpool $60,000

NEW SOUTH WALES

Up to $60,000

Gilgandra Museum and Historical Society Incorporated Experience our Amazing History @ Gilgandra Rural Museum
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability and sustainability of the Gilgandra Museum and Historical Society Incorporated through upgrading the kitchen, exhibition/meeting room flooring, lighting, audio equipment and promotional brochure.
Gilgandra $50,909
Gooloogong Historical Society Incorporated Stage 1 – Restoration and Revitalisation of Gooloogong’s Meeting Place
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase opportunity for community cohesion through
the restoration of the Gooloogong Clubhouse to house the Gooloogong Historical Society.
Gooloogong $59,752
Lower Lachlan Community Services Incorporated Roof Over Community
Support the capacity and sustainability of Lower Lachlan Community Services through the replacement of the roof.
Lake Cargelligo $50,000
Mandagery Public Hall Land Manager Improved Amenities for the Mandagery Hall
Build the capacity of the Mandagery Public Hall Land Manager with upgrades to the amenities with an Eco-Flo toilet system.
Mandagery $55,000

Up to $20,000

Coleambally Community Club Limited Installation of Tesla Battery for Solar Power Storage
Support climate resilience and sustainability of the Coleambally Community Club through the purchase of a Tesla power wall battery for excess power storage.
Coleambally $19,841
Tullera Community Hall Incorporated No Y17180 27  RAMP US UP
Reduce social isolation and support strong social cohesion and connection with an upgrade of a disabled access ramp at the Tullera Community Hall.
Tullera $18,000

QUEENSLAND

Up to $60,000

Bloomin Beautiful Blackbutt Festival Incorporated Blackbutt Arts Strategy, Big Avocado and Arts Project Officer: Towards a Strategic Future
Support stronger economies and sustainability of local tourism events with the development of the Blackbutt Art Strategy and a Project Plan to build a Big Avocado in Blackbutt.
Blackbutt $58,744
Broxburn Music Club Staged for Success
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity of Broxburn volunteers with the repair and upgrade of the stage and the construction of a lockable shed at The Broxburn Community Grounds.
Broxburn $58,401
Cecil Plains History Group Relocation and Restumping of Norwin CWA Hall
Build the capacity of the Cecil Plains History Group through the relocation and restumping of Norwin CWA Hall to provide an all-weather space for historical displays and a community meeting space.
Cecil Plains $55,000
Goondiwindi Pastoral and Agricultural Society Fencing for the Future
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity of the local organisation to support their community through drought with the installation of internal zone fencing at the Goondiwindi Showgrounds.
Goondiwindi $60,000
Mondure Public Hall Committee Incorporated The Mondure Public Hall Amenities Refurbishment including a Disabled Toilet
Support the capacity and sustainability of the Mondure Public Hall Committee with upgrades and refurbishment to amenities.
Mondure $58,680
Mulga Mates Centre Incorporated Playground upgrade
Reduce volunteer fatigue, and support sustainability and capacity of Mulga Mates Centre with the installation of a playground to improved early childhood development.
Quilpie $53,958
Outback Festival Incorporated ‘Giants of the Outback’
Reduce social isolation and enhance economic recovery through the delivery of the 2021 Outback Festival in Winton, QLD.
Winton $45,000
Roma Historical Precincts Incorporated Preparation of a Business Case to be used as a Supporting Document for the Development of the Roma Butter Factory
Support organisational capacity and sustainability with the development of a business case to support the redevelopment of the Roma Butter Factory as a visitor experience to boost economic activity and visitation in Roma.
Roma $49,800
Tansey Show Society Incorporated Purchase Shaded Grandstands and Water Troughs for Tansey Showgrounds
Build the capacity of Tansey Show Society through the purchase of two transportable shaded grandstands.
Tansey $23,848

Up to $20,000

Bullyard Hall, Sports and Recreation Club Incorporated Assisting the disabled
Reduce social isolation and build community participation opportunities through the installation of an access ramp at Bullyard Hall.
Bullyard $9,460
Drillham Primary Parents and Citizens Association Along the Garden Path
Reduce social isolation through the provision of creative arts activities enabling the community of Miles to come together and connect during times of hardship.
Miles $13,000
Guides Queensland – Warwick District
Guides Queensland
Refresh and Replacement of the Floor Coverings in 1st Warwick Girl Guide Hut
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of the 1st Warwick Girl Guide Hut through refreshing and replacing floor coverings
Warwick $9,878
Outback Gondwana Foundation Limited Futureproofing with a Forklift
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity of Outback Gondwana Foundation by supplying a forklift.
Eromanga $20,000
Stanthorpe Agricultural Society Gotta get a Gator!
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity of Stanthorpe Agricultural Society through the purchase of a ‘Gator’ utility vehicle to support community events held at the facility.
Stanthorpe $19,140
Warra Tennis Club Incorporated Serving for Sustainability with Solar Panels
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity and sustainability of the Warra Tennis Club through the purchase and installation of a solar panel system.
Warra $8,710
Maranoa Regional Council Ignite and Excite: Career Pathway Taster
Support opportunities for learning and education participation at Roma, Mitchell, Injune and Surat with the Ignite & Excite: Career Pathway Taster project.
Roma $5,530

VICTORIA

Up to $20,000

Yaapeet Community Club Incorporated Turkey Bottom Lake – Picnic Shelter
Reduce volunteer fatigue and enhance opportunities for social cohesion and connection through the construction of picnic shelter at Turkey Bottom Lake.
Yaapeet $20,000

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Up to $60,000

ABC Foundation Limited AWRAE: Aboriginal Women’s Research Assistant & Evaluation Training Project
Enhance opportunity for leadership development and skills training for Indigenous women of Carnarvon and surrounds, through the delivery of the Aboriginal Women’s Research Assistant and Evaluation Training Project (AWRAE) focused on research and evaluation for projects delivered in Indigenous communities.
Carnarvon $60,000
Wheatbelt Business Network Incorporated Accredited Mental Health First Aid Training in the Wheatbelt
Support leadership development and skills training in Wheatbelt Business Network through the delivery of Mental Health First Aid Training.
Quairading $26,300

[1] 2020 Australian Philanthropy Awards – Best Grant Program

[2] Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology. Drought Rainfall deficiencies and water availability. 7 October 2020. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/2I1PSqA.

Networks to Build Drought Resilience and Drought Resilience Leaders

FRRR will soon be providing increased support into remote, rural and regional communities to prepare for the impacts of drought, after being selected by the Australian Government to deliver its Networks to Build Drought Resilience program. FRRR is also part of a consortium delivering the Drought Resilience Leaders program.

Funded through the Australian Government’s $5 billion Future Drought Fund, both programs will help remote, rural and regional people access the tools, skills and support to build and foster leader networks, and to develop and roll out drought resilience initiatives in their communities.

The Networks to Build Drought Resilience (NBDR) program will help people in agricultural communities to develop skills, participate in risk management planning, and foster projects that encourage connectedness and improve wellbeing. It will also support small-scale infrastructure projects to make community facilities drought resilient to increase overall wellbeing and reduce social isolation.

Natalie Egleton, CEO of FRRR, said that the Networks to Build Drought Resilience program will support future-focussed initiatives led by local community groups and network organisations that play such a vital role in local and regional resilience

“Networks and community leadership are the backbone of strong, vibrant communities and are essential to ensuring future preparedness for drought and the associated social, economic, environmental impacts that can be so devastating for remote, rural, and regional communities.

“This is an exciting opportunity for building drought resilience from the ground up and we look forward to supporting the fantastic ideas and solutions that we know are ready to go across the country,” Ms Egleton said.

Through the Drought Resilience Leaders (DRL) program rural leaders will be able to access training and support that will help them to develop and undertake a project to build drought resilience in their communities. Partnering with the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation (ARLF) and the Rural Economies Centre of Excellence (RECoE), FRRR will manage a grants stream that will allow leadership program participants and their communities to activate their community-strengthening ideas.

Ms Egleton said that this program means more opportunities for local people to take the lead in finding meaningful and tailored solutions for their community’s increased climate resilience.

“Local leaders know how to get things done. They know how to bring people together, to motivate and to problem-solve. Backing these leaders is key to ensuring the long-term vitality of Australia’s remote, rural and regional communities, particularly those battling drought.

“We are thrilled to be partnering with the ARLF and RECoE to provide these local leaders with access to such invaluable training and help them to bring their drought resilience projects to life,” Ms Egleton said.

For more information visit
The Hon David Littleproud MP – https://minister.awe.gov.au/littleproud/media-releases/drought-leaders-networks-programs
Australian Rural Leadership Foundation – https://rural-leaders.org.au/arlf-to-lead-consortia-to-deliver-drought-program/ 

The Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal (FRRR) has awarded $1,454,165 in grants for 41 community-led projects that will help tackle the challenges that drought-affected communities across Australia continue to face through its award-winning grants program, Tackling Tough Times Together (TTTT). [1]

The grants will support a wide range of initiatives that are designed to meet the needs of people in each drought-affected place, from Lake Cargelligo in NSW, Atitjere in the NT, Hughenden in QLD, Truro in SA, Murrayville in VIC, to Brookton in WA. These projects will help to create community cohesion and resilience by creating supportive environments, reducing social isolation and increasing community engagement in remote, rural, and regional communities across drought-affected Australia.

Although parts of New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia having received substantial rainfall this year, these regions, as well as many other parts of the country, continue to be affected by the long-term impacts of persistent rainfall deficits[2]

Nina O’Brien, Disaster Resilience & Recovery Lead for FRRR, said that while it’s no longer on the front pages, the impact of the ongoing drought continues to be top-of-mind for FRRR.

“Despite recent rain in some places, we know the effects of long-term rainfall deficits don’t just disappear. It takes 18 to 24 months of sustained average rainfalls for communities to finally be able to move beyond the immediate impacts of drought. Most communities have had nowhere near this amount of rain – and many have had none at all, which is why communities still need support. This has been made evident by the record value of funding requests we received for this round of TTTT,” Ms O’Brien said.

“The pandemic has added extra financial strain to communities already dealing with drought, adding to the pressure felt by many local groups, including very fatigued volunteers. Community cohesion plays such an important role in drought recovery and COVID-19 restrictions have only exacerbated the social isolation and disengagement that many of these communities have been working hard to tackle.

“In spite of the difficulties, we are inspired by the many local organisations that persistently work to develop the places where they live. These groups are so resilient and continue to find ways to seed and strengthen, adapt and evolve, and innovate and renew their community. They are finding ways to bring their community together and build that social cohesion, whether it be through community events and festivals, making things more accessible for people living with disability, or by repairing and upgrading facilities to create a safe place for locals to gather.

“Thanks to the support of our donor partners, we can take a little pressure off them and help their great ideas come to fruition,” Ms O’Brien said.

Some of the 41 projects awarded this round include:

  • Aldersyde Agricultural Hall Inc, WA – Aldersyde Agricultural Hall – $110,000 – Increased accessibility and reduced volunteer fatigue through upgrades to the Aldersyde Agricultural Hall kitchen, toilet facilities, water storage, verandah and parking area.
  • Upper Lachlan Shire Council, NSW – 2021 Gunning Arts Festival – $6,925 – Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability and sustainability of the 2021 Gunning Arts Festival to provide opportunities for economic growth and community connection whilst supporting the arts in regional Australia.
  • The Rex Monto Limited, QLD – The Rex: Theatre, Gallery and Community Hub – $ 58,500 – Enhance community identity with the restoration and development of a theatre, gallery, and community Hub at The Rex.
  • Isolated Children’s Parents’ Association (Port Augusta Branch), SA – ‘Bush Kids Honey’ – $19,186 – Support opportunities for social and educational participation and address disadvantage caused by the drought, for children and young people through the provision of bee hives for Students of the Air – Port Augusta region.
  • Outback Highway Development Council – Harts Range/ Atitjere, NT – Outback Way Outdoor Gallery – Installation – $60,000 Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity, capability and sustainability to support the community through the installation of billboards of local artwork along highway.
  • Murrayville and District Liaison Committee, VIC – Pioneer Park Playground Shade Structure – $17,303 Reduce social isolation by facilitating social connection through the installation of shade over the Pioneer Park Playground, Murrayville.

Tackling Tough Times Together is possible thanks to the collaborative support of several donors, including the Australian Government which committed $15M to be distributed over three years. Generous contributions have also been made by Pratt Foundation, Stockland CARE Foundation, Paul Ramsay Foundation, The Snow Foundation, Tim Fairfax Family Foundation, Henroth Group and private donors from across the nation.

Applications for the TTTT program are always open and groups in areas currently drought-affected, or that have been affected in the last 18 months, are encouraged to apply for funding support.

The cut-off dates for future rounds are:

  • 25 February 2021. Outcomes will be advised late May 2021.
  • 24 May 2021. (Note, full applications for the $150,000 grant tier must be received by 13 April 2021.) Outcomes will be advised late August 2021.

The full list of grant recipients and their projects are below.

Jump to : WA | NSW | NT | QLD | SA | VIC

Organisation

Project

Location

Grant

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Up to $150,000

Aldersyde Agricultural Hall Incorporated Aldersyde Hall Facility Upgrade
Increased accessibility and reduced volunteer fatigue through upgrades to the Aldersyde Agricultural Hall kitchen, toilet facilities, water storage, verandah, and parking area.
Aldersyde $110,000

NEW SOUTH WALES

Up to $60,000

Blayney Town Association 52 Weeks of Creativity
Reduce social isolation and enhance local tourism through the provision of Blayney’s 52 Weeks of creativity including workshops, community gatherings, school holiday activities, markets, and live music events at the recently restored Blayney Railway Station “Platform” facility.
Blayney $47,820
Bourke & District Children’s Services Co-location of Early Childhood and Integrated Health Services
Enhance social and educational participation for children disadvantaged by drought through the development of a feasibility plan for the Bourke district.
Bourke $57,000
Lakes Alive Progress Association Incorporated Water Tower Mural Lake Cargelligo
Enhance local economic recovery and renewal through the development of the Lake Cargelligo Water Tower Mural.
Lake Cargelligo $59,960
Nymboida Canoeing Limited Nymboida Volunteer Hub
Reduce social isolation and increase organisational capacity and capability through the expansion of the Nymboida Volunteer Hub.
Nymboida $60,000
Sunnyside Hall Management Committee Incorporated Re-Roofing Sunnyside Hall
Upgrade meeting space that supports connectedness for drought affected residents, through replacement of roof and guttering at Sunnyside Hall.
Tenterfield $36,500

Up to $20,000

Friends of the Gwydir Fitness Centre
Gwydir Shire Council
Gwydir Fitness Centre equipment program
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of Friends of the Gwydir Fitness Centre through the provision of exercise equipment at the Warialda and Bingara Community Gyms.
Bingara $17,973
Moree Mainly Music Group
Mainly Music (Australia) Limited
Moree Mainly Music Group
Support opportunities for social and educational participation and address disadvantage caused by the drought, for children through the provision of music session structures and materials for Moree Mainly Music Group.
Moree $867
Murrurundi Community Men’s Shed Incorporated Murrurundi Men’s Shed Extension
Reduce social isolation by facilitating strong social cohesion and connection through the expansion of the Murrurundi Community Men’s Shed facility.
Murrurundi $17,320
Pilliga Community Centre Incorporated New Windows
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of the Pilliga Community Centre through the installation of new windows.
Pilliga $6,657
Gunning Arts Festival Section 355 Committee
Upper Lachlan Shire Council
2021 Gunning Arts Festival
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability and sustainability of the 2021 Gunning Arts Festival to provide opportunities for economic growth, community connection whilst supporting the arts in regional Australia.
Gunning $6,925
Warren Chamber Music Festival Incorporated Warren Chamber Music Festival
Reduce social isolation, enhance educational participation for young people, and stimulate local economy through the delivery of the Warren Chamber Music Festival.
Nevertire $20,000

NORTHERN TERRITORY

Up to $60,000

Outback Highway Development Council Incorporated Outback Way Outdoor Gallery – Installation
Support economic recovery and renewal through the installation of 14 outdoor billboards of local artwork along the Plenty Highway in the NT.
Harts Range/ Atitjere $60,000

QUEENSLAND

Up to $60,000

Back Plains Primary Parents and Citizens Association Enclosing our Covered Outside Learning Area
Enhance social and educational participation for children disadvantaged by drought through enhancements to the covered outdoor learning space at the Back Plains State School.
Back Plains $25,410
Bidjara Media and Broadcasting Company Limited Expansion of Broadcasting & News Services
Reduce social isolation through the expansion of Bidjara Media and Broadcasting community radio into Thargomindah, Quilpie, St George, and Roma.
Thargomindah $60,000
Bollon and District Community Group Incorporated Click goes the Shears in Bollon
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of a local not-for-profit organisation to provide support to their community through the enhancement of the Bollon Heritage Centre enabling under cover space to restore, showcase and preserve local historical artefacts.
Bollon $60,000
Bungunya State School Parents and Citizens Committee Operation Outdoors
Enhance social and educational participation for children disadvantaged by drought through the installation of an undercover learning space and an irrigation system at Bungunya State School.
Bungunya $59,245
Charleville Community Men’s Shed Incorporated Charleville Community Men’s Shed Incorporated
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of a local not-for-profit organisation to provide support to their community, through enhancements at the Charleville Community Men’s Shed.
Charleville $60,000
Chinchilla Historical Society Incorporated The Fire Towers Interpretive Centre
Enhance local economic recovery and renewal through the development of the Chinchilla Historical Society’s Fire Towers Interpretive Centre adding to local tourism offerings.
Chinchilla $45,748
Proston Men’s Shed Incorporated Proston Men’s Shed Incorporated
Increased capacity to deliver community activities and reduce social isolation, through fit out of newly constructed Men’s Shed in Proston.
Proston $59,972
Hughenden State Emergency Service (SES) Group
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services
Training and Storage rooms
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity, capability, and sustainability through enhancements at the Hughenden SES Shed.
Hughenden $44,228
Jericho State Emergency Service (SES)
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services
SES Jericho Facility Fit out
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build organisational capacity, capability, and sustainability of the local not for profit organisation to support the community, particularly during time of drought through the completion of a fit out at the Jericho SES Shed.
Jericho $29,120
Queensland Rural Regional and Remote Women’s Network Incorporated Toward 2030 – The Future of RRR Women (Established Wisdom Underpinning Innovative Futures)
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build organisation capacity, capability, and sustainability through the development of a strategic plan including organisational collaboration, development, and action planning to secure the future of QRRRWN.
Goondiwindi $27,640
St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School Barcaldine The Next Chapter
Enhance participation in education, through purchase of new technology and books for St Joseph’s Primary School, Barcaldine.
Barcaldine $31,000
The Rex Monto Limited The Rex: Theatre, Gallery and Community Hub
Enhance community identity with the restoration and development of a theatre, gallery, and community Hub at The Rex.
Monto $58,500
Windorah Development Board Pioneers Park
Strengthen economic recovery and renewal through the development of Pioneer Park in Windorah to enhance the tourist experience and showcase local history.
Windorah $55,000

Up to $20,000

Alpha District Tourism & Development Association Incorporated Additional Resources for our Tivoli Theatre Museum
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity through the provision of additional resources including technological equipment, a ladder, display cabinetry and signage for the Alpha ‘Tivoli Theatre’ Museum.
Alpha $18,651
Eumamurrin Recreation Association Incorporated Eumamurrin Water Infrastructure
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of local not-for-profit organisations to provide support to their communities, through the provision of water infrastructure at the Eumamurrin Recreation Reserve and hall.
Eumamurrin $17,329
St Therese’s Catholic Primary School Parents & Friends Association Light Tower and Electrical Points for our School Oval
Build economic strength and sustainability, contributing to a stronger social fabric and increased resilience and connection to community through purchasing lighting and electrical infrastructure for annual community event.
Monto $12,896
Wandoan Arts Council Incorporated Wandoan Arts Council Creative Arts Escape
Reduce social isolation by facilitating social cohesion and connection opportunities through the delivery of Wondoan Arts Council Creative Arts Escape in 2021.
Wandoan $20,000

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Up to $60,000

Cleve District Hospital Auxiliary Cleve Community Aged Care Bus
Reduce social isolation and volunteer fatigue and increase organisational capacity through the provision of a wheelchair friendly bus for Cleve District Hospital services.
Cleve $40,000
Copley Progress Association Incorporated Copley Green Learning Centre
Reduce social isolation through the development of the Copley Green Learning Centre, a Community Kitchen Garden project.
Copley $40,000
Koolunga Primary School Outdoor Learning Space
Enhance social and educational participation for children disadvantaged by drought through the construction of an outdoor, undercover learning space for the children of Koolunga Primary School.
Koolunga $30,000
Truro and District Community Association Incorporated Town Entry Statements
Enhance economic recovery and renewal through the installation of town entrance statement signage for the Truro township on the Sturt Highway.
Truro $49,500

Up to $20,000

Isolated Children’s Parents’ Association (Port Augusta Branch) Bush Kids Honey
Support opportunities for social and educational participation and address disadvantage caused by the drought, for children and young people through the provision of beehives for Students of the Air – Port Augusta region.
Port Augusta Region $19,186
Rotary Club of Peterborough Incorporated Community Shower & Bathroom
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability and sustainability of the Salvation Army to provide support to their community, particularly where they are playing an increased role during the drought through the installation of showering facilities, in Peterborough.
Peterborough $12,000
The Beltana Progress Association Incorporated Creating a Permanent Exhibition of Flinders Ranges Art in the Beltana Hall as a Tourist Attraction
Enhance economic recovery and renewal through the creation of a permanent art exhibition at the historic Beltana Hall.
Beltana $12,995

VICTORIA

Up to $20,000

Heyfield RSL External Cladding
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of a local not-for-profit organisations through enhancements at the Heyfield RSL.
Heyfield $10,000
Lake Boga Waterski Club Incorporated Lake Boga Waterski Club Kitchen Facility Upgrade
Reduce social isolation, stimulate the local economy and increase the capacity, capability and sustainability of Lake Boga Water ski Club as they play an increased role during the drought by enhancements to clubhouse facilities.
Lake Boga $20,000
Meerlieu Public Hall Planning for the Future – Meerlieu Public Hall
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of Meerlieu Public Hall Committee of Management through the development of designs and documentation for future usage planning and facility enhancements.
Meerlieu $17,420
Murrayville and District Liaison Committee Incorporated Pioneer Park Playground Shade Structure
Reduce social isolation by facilitating social connection through the installation of shade over the Pioneer Park Playground, Murrayville.
Murrayville $17,303

[1] 2020 Australian Philanthropy Awards – Best Grant Program

[2] Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology. Drought Rainfall deficiencies and water availability. 7 October 2020. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/2I1PSqA.