Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal

Includes more than $600,000 for Black Summer bushfire recovery

Ninety locally-led initiatives that are set to strengthen remote, rural and regional communities across Australia are sharing in $1,057,044 in funding, thanks to FRRR’s Strengthening Rural Communities (SRC) grant program.

More than $1M hits the ground in rural communities across the country

The SRC program supports a broad array of projects that address locally determined needs and priorities of smaller remote, rural, and regional communities, including places impacted by the 2019-20 bushfires.

For communities affected by the Black Summer bushfires, 34 community-led projects are sharing $602,958 in grants through SRC’s Bushfire Recovery stream of funding. These grants range from $2,618 for a communications upgrade for the Rocky Glen community in New South Wales, to $25,000 for a project that will improve the safety and security of the community hall at Tamrookum in Queensland.

A further $454,086 in grants have been awarded through SRC’s Small & Vital funding stream to 56 projects that local communities have prioritised for their long-term viability and vitality. Funding ranges from $550 for an equipment safety upgrade for the Riding for the Disabled WA group at Mount Barker in Western Australia, through to $10,000 for a grief support program for young people in Drysdale, Victoria.

Natalie Egleton, CEO of FRRR, said FRRR is seeing a wide range of requests from across the country, reflecting the diverse needs in each place.

“Rural communities continue to inspire and move forward despite the numerous difficulties they’ve faced and the uncertainty ahead. They want something to hope for, to build towards, and we continue to be here to support and celebrate their achievements and are ready to walk with them through any challenges they may be dealing with, or to harness any opportunities they have in front of them.

“With COVID-19 restrictions still being unpredictable, we want groups to know that if you have received a grant from us and, for whatever reason, you have had to delay, postpone or cancel your project, please reach out to our team. We want to work with you to adapt or redefine your project so that the funding stays in your community,” Ms Egleton explained.

With the 2021-22 bushfire season approaching, disaster preparedness is key, especially for those communities devastated by the 2019-20 bushfires.

“Being better prepared means different things for different places. For some, this means improving access to community meeting places, for others it’s ensuring they have the proper equipment and training so that volunteers can protect and support their community through a disaster event. But for some places, preparedness means completely rebuilding community infrastructure that was lost due to the bushfires,” Ms Egleton said.

“We are pleased to be able to provide this support to the communities that have been affected by the fires. And we’ll continue to support them as time goes on and their needs evolve and change.”

Some of the 90 projects awarded include:

  • Lions Club of Ulladulla Milton, NSW – FAB (Farmers at Burrill) – $14,896 – Boost local spending with improved marketing and entertainment at the farmers markets.   
  • Engawala Arts Centre Aboriginal Corporation, NT – Developing the Engawala Arts Centre – $8,595 – Facilitate the set up and development of an Arts Centre that will build tourism-based income in a very remote community.
  • The Little Pocket Association, QLD – Resilience through Nature Play – $25,000 – Support children and young families to build resilience and disaster preparedness through nature play, storytelling and strengthening connection to place.
  • Tatiara District Council, SA – Tatiara Multicultural Food Festival – $9,900 – Encourage whole community engagement and build cultural awareness through the delivery of a food festival.
  • Swansea Primary School Parents and Friends Association, TAS – Nature Play for Rural Families – $10,000 – Strengthen community connection to the natural environment and enhance educational activities for school children through the development of a Nature Play Garden area.
  • Lakes Entrance Mechanics Institute Management Committee Inc, VIC – Replacement of Furniture as part of Maintaining and Redeveloping the Lakes Entrance Mechanics Institute Hall – $17,249 – Provide a fit-for-purpose facility and help volunteers to support their community through the purchase of stackable chairs.
  • Active Farmers Ltd, WA – Active Farmers Games WA – Increasing Awareness of the Link Between Physical Activity and Improved Mental Wellbeing – $6,340 – Encourage rural communities to be physically active and more connected with inaugural WA Active Farmers Games.

The SRC program is collaboratively supported by a number of generous donors, which are listed on FRRR’s website.

The next round of SRC applications is currently being assessed and will be announced in December. The current round is accepting applications until 23 November 2021, with funds to be awarded in March 2022.

More information is available on FRRR’s website – https://frrr.org.au/ strengthening-rural-communities/.

To support grants like this through FRRR, make a tax-deductible donation at frrr.org.au/giving/.

The full list of grant recipients and their projects are below.

Jump to: NSW | NT | QLD | SA | TAS | VIC | WA

OrganisationProjectLocationGrant
NEW SOUTH WALES
Bushfire Recovery
Mad Proppa Deadly Indigenous CorporationReVibe - Northern NSW Music Workshop Tour (Tamworth/Armidale)
Inspire community to come together to celebrate culture through music writing, production and recording workshops.
Armidale$25,000
Trustees of the Roman Catholic Church for the Archdiocese of Canberra & Goulburn as Trustee for Marymead Child and Family CentreRural Rugby: Resilient Recovery
Encourage young people to be active and enhance their mental health and nutrition through a school based after-school rugby enrichment program.
Batehaven$25,000
Campfire Co-op LtdParticipatory Leadership Training for South Coast Bushfire Affected Communities
Develop leadership skills by training community members in bushfire-impacted areas the Art of Hosting Conversations.
Bega Valley$25,000
Southcoast Health and Sustainability AlliancePower on the Move
Boost the community’s ability to respond to future disasters by purchase of a mobile generator, to be made available free of charge for use by the community.
Bodalla$25,000
Capital Region Community Services LimitedBungee Youth Resilience Program in Braidwood
Boost and strengthen the resilience of young people by running a creative art based program.
Braidwood$21,432
Lions Club of Ulladulla MiltonFAB (Farmers at Burrill)
Boost local spending with improved marketing and entertainment at the farmers markets.
Burrill Lake$14,896
Comboyne Community Association IncTowards Opening Day
Boost and strengthen the local economy by restoring the original farmhouse fireplace in the Comboyne Museum complex.
Comboyne$9,200
Copmanhurst Pre-School IncAboriginal Mural and Art Lessons
Improve access to local recovery activities for children and families at Copmanhurst Preschool by providing a local Indigenous artist to offer Indigenous Art classes and a mural at the centre.
Copmanhurst$3,750
Eden Community Access Centre IncBuilding Social Capital and Enhancing Social Outcomes
Boost and strengthen the local economy by employing a Resilience and Recovery Officer to help find local solutions to bushfire recovery.
Eden$25,000
Marine Rescue Merimbula
Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW
Marine Rescue Merimbula Training Computer
Boost capacity of Marine Rescue Merimbula to provide essential volunteer training through the purchase of computer equipment.
Merimbula$5,000
Catholic Parish of St Mary's Star of the Sea MiltonShoalhaven Rising from the Ashes - Stage 2
Boost the community’s bushfire recovery by hiring a coordinator to facilitate & create art-based community workshops.
Milton$13,587
Salt CareWarehouse Food Storage Expansion
Support for individuals and families living with disadvantage through the purchase and fit out of additional warehouse storage for distribution of needed personal and household items.
Nowra$24,600
Oberon and District Museum Society IncFitout of New Forest and Timber Interpretive Center
Boost local spending in Oberon by developing the Forest and Timber Interpretive Centre.
Oberon$21,614
Pambula Chamber of Commerce & Associates Inc Pambula Art Project - Stage 2
Boost and strengthen the local economy through creation and installation of art trail murals.
Pambula$25,000
Borah Creek Public Hall Land ManagerSupply and Install Telstra and Optus YAGI Communications Systems in the Hall
Improve the community's ability to communicate with the outside world in cases of emergency by installing a mobile phone signal boosting antenna.
Rocky Glen$2,618
First Steps Count IncorporatedMany Hands Build, Create and Unite - Our Design Journey
Encourage people to come together and celebrate through art workshops leading to a collaborative artwork.
Taree$25,000
Manning River Aero Club IncMRAC Solar
Boost the community’s ability to respond to future disasters by installing a solar power and battery system to provide a backup in case of power failures.
Taree$25,000
One Vision Productions LimitedEMPOWER our Community
Celebrate and cultivate a sense of identity and cultural connection for Indigenous youth through Caring for Country music and film workshops.
Tweed Heads$25,000
Small & Vital
Bellingen Youth Orchestra IncorporatedVolunteer Management Strategy
Increase the sustainability and profile of Bellingen Youth Orchestra and reduce volunteer fatigue through implementing a Volunteer Management Strategy and website.
Bellingen$8,000
Berry Branch
Country Womens Association of NSW
Community Craft Workshops for a Sustainable Future
Boost creativity, connection and support for local artists by providing a series of sustainable craft workshops.
Berry$3,300
Forbes Public School P&C Association IncWiradjuri Mural Project at Forbes Public School
Enhance community connection and cultural identity through Forbes Public School students painting a mural with local Wiradjuri Indigenous artist.
Forbes$5,000
Adavale Lane Community Centre IncorporatedLight Up and Cool Adavale Lane Community Centre
Increase community usage and functionality by lighting up and cooling down the Adavale Lane Community Hall.
Goonumbla$10,000
Mona Magazine
Western Riverina Arts Inc
Mona Women's Magazine - Second Edition
Enhance rural women's identity, wellbeing and sense of place by printing the 2nd edition of Mona Magazine, paying for the contributors' pieces and contributing to wages for the editorial staff.
Leeton$10,000
Boori Dreaming Womens GroupAwakening the Dream
Increase cultural identity and creativity through purchasing sewing machines, equipment and craft supplies for Boori Dreaming Women's Group.
Narrandera$2,860
Umina Beach Branch
Country Womens Association of NSW
Build Accessible Ramp
New entry and accessible bathroom with one accessible toilet and second toilet plus a shower. Increase accessibility of the Umina Beach CWA hall by installing a wheelchair accessible ramp.
Umina Beach$4,325
Tharpa Choeling IncorporatedRed Rattler Community Garden
Increase community participation and connection by converting a vintage train carriage into a new community garden.
Wellington$9,247
Circartus Incorporated Governance Guidance and Review
Enhance community connection and creativity by engaging an industry- experienced governance consultant to ensure the sustainability of Circartus.
Wingham$9,750
Woodstock Branch
Country Womens Association of NSW
Improving Our Street Cred
Increase community participation and functionality through the refurbishment of the Woodstock Branch CWA hall.
Woodstock$9,865
NORTHERN TERRITORY
Small & Vital
Engawala Arts Centre Aboriginal CorporationDeveloping the Engawala Arts Centre
Facilitate the set up and development of an Arts Centre that will build tourism based income in a very remote community.
Engawala$8,595
West Daly Regional CouncilWadeye, Nganmarriyanga and Peppimenarti Annual Clean-up Day
Reduce health and safety risks via a Community Clean Up Day to remove rubbish in remote communities.
Wadeye$7,578
Wagait Shire CouncilWagait Youth Program
Encourage young people to be physically active and participate in community activities, with Youth Group excursions and skateboard clinics.
Wagait Beach$6,000
QUEENSLAND
Bushfire Recovery
The Little Pocket AssociationResilience through Nature Play
Support children and young families to build resilience and disaster preparedness through nature play, storytelling and connection to place.
Beechmont$25,000
Wildlife Noosa LtdNoosa Bushfire Readiness & Myna Bird Project
Support recovery from bushfires and volunteer training through purchase of a vehicle and equipment to improve disaster preparedness and conservation efforts.
Cooran$12,248
Charters Towers State Emergency Service
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services
Ladder Racks for Operational Response Vehicles
Support volunteers' safety and capacity to respond to emergencies through provision of ladder racks on response vehicles.
Pentland$5,680
Tamrookum Memorial Hall IncorporatedHall Restoration
Increase safety and support recovery through upgrade of community owned hall.
Tamrookum$25,000
Tin Can Bay Community and Mens Shed IncorporatedStorage Shed
Support community recovery and wellbeing through purchase of a storage shed for materials and equipment.
Tin Can Bay$15,336
Small & Vital
Atherton Performing Arts IncAtherton Performing Arts Lighting Equipment - New Lighting Desk Console
Expand the use of the Atherton Performing Arts theatre by installing a new lighting console.
Atherton$7,997
Barcaldine Rugby League Football Club Inc"Bluey Live!" Kids' Concert, Meet & Greet
Strengthen social connection and encourage culturally vibrant communities through a "Bluey Live!" kids' concert for the remote community of Barcaldine and surrounds.
Barcaldine$10,000
Beeron Road Country Club IncBeeron Road Country Club Community Hub Development
Grow ways to support the community through refurbishment of a disused school into a vibrant rural Community Hub.
Beeron$10,000
Selectability LtdSelectability Mental Health Toolbox
Improve mental health of remote communities by developing an online training course to strengthen community capacity to identify and support one another.
Cloncurry$9,775
Cooktown School of Art Society IncComputer System Plus Reception Area Upgrade
Strengthen and increase volunteer capacity and access to online training, by installing a new computer system and reception desk.
Cooktown$10,000
Gloucester Sports and Recreation Ass IncOutdoor Theatre
Promote recovery centre and encourage people to come together by installing an outdoor venue screen and projector.
Hideaway Bay$10,000
Malanda Chamber of Commerce IncorporatedMalanda’s Adventure Park
Encourage children's development and increase community connection through installation of a fence around a new adventure playground.
Malanda$10,000
Gidgee Healing
Mount Isa Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Limited
Women's Group
Boost social inclusion and wellbeing through delivery of a monthly Women's Group for Indigenous women in Mount Isa.
Mount Isa$10,000
Highways and Byways LtdSeeds of Connection - Healing and Belonging Through Culture
Enhance cultural identity, resilience and wellbeing of Indigenous children and their families in Roma by providing a two week cultural immersion program for 7-12 year olds.
Roma$9,740
Care Balonne Association IncProvide Safe Accessibility Services to Care Balonne Clients and Staff
Improve the use and accessibility of the Care Balonne community hub through toilet facility upgrade.
St George$10,000
Texas Show Society Upgrade to Showground Facilities
Increase amenity and participation in community events by providing a grandstand for the Texas Showgrounds.
Texas$10,000
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
Bushfire Recovery
Adelaide and Hills Koala Rescue - 1300KOALAZ IncorporatedVegetation Regeneration Planting
Conserve native habitat and support recovery from 2019 bushfires through the restoration of bushland.
Cudlee Creek$24,289
Edithburgh Football Club and Sports AssocCommunity and Sporting Clubs Working to Improve Community Safety
Improve a location that provides refuge in times of emergency through the installation of water tanks.
Edithburgh$22,090
Small & Vital
Andamooka Progress and Opalminers Association IncCommunity Facility Rationalisation & Development Project – Upgrade 'Old Community Church' to Passive Recreation Facility
Encourage community engagement and social wellbeing by enhancing facilities.
Andamooka$10,000
Tatiara District CouncilTatiara Multicultural Food Festival
Encourage whole community engagement and build cultural awareness through the delivery of a food festival.
Bordertown$9,900
Cummins & District Enterprise CommitteeWinter Wonderland - Platform for Success
Improve an organisation’s ability to support the community and strengthen the town's revenue through developing a storage shed used for the Cummins Christmas display.
Cummins$4,140
Bedford Kadina
Bedford Phoenix Incorporated
Kadina Pergola and Deck for Supported Employees
Expand supported employment opportunities for people living with a disability in Kadina through the construction of pergola and deck.
Kadina$10,000
The Food Embassy IncorporatedSupporting Citizens in Creating Local and Sustainable Food Systems
Provide opportunities for local people to gain knowledge about growing and consuming healthy foods, through the delivery of the Food Matters program in Strathalbyn and Milang.
Strathalbyn$9,585
TASMANIA
Small & Vital
Lions Club of Lilydale IncorporatedLilydale Men's Community Shed
Support volunteer skill development and encourage social interaction, through the establishment of a Men's Shed in Lilydale.
Lilydale$10,000
Freycinet Volunteer Marine Rescue Association IncPutting You Through Now!
Boost safety and disaster preparedness by installing telecommunications hardware at a remote Marine Rescue facility.
Swansea$2,244
Swansea Primary School Parents and Friends AssociationNature Play for Rural Families
Strengthen community connection to the natural environment and enhance educational activities for school children through the development of a Nature Play Garden area.
Swansea$10,000
Coastal FM IncDevelopment of Recording Studio
Improve connection to community and broaden the capability of a community-run radio station through establishing a recording studio.
Wynyard$5,000
VICTORIA
Bushfire Recovery
Bright Spring Festival
Bright and District Chamber of Commerce Incorporated
Bright Spring Festival Drive-In Movie
Boost a community festival by providing a family-friendly activity and support recovery from the 2019/2020 bushfires by holding a drive-in movie night.
Bright$5,000
Cassilis Recreation Reserve Committee of ManagementLiving it Up
Increase opportunities to support local connectedness and recover from the 2019/2020 bushfires through the delivery of a whole community music event.
Cassilis$4,290
Lakes Entrance Mechanics Institute Management Committee IncReplacement of Furniture as part of Maintaining and Redeveloping the Lakes Entrance Mechanics Institute Hall
Provide a fit-for-purpose facility and help volunteers to support their community through the purchase of stackable chairs.
Lakes Entrance$17,249
Traralgon Men's Shed and Woodworking IncMallacoota Picnic Tables and Benches
Increase connection to place and build community partnerships through the provision of outdoor furniture for Mallacoota township.
Mallacoota$20,000
Mitta Valley Community TV IncMitta Valley Community Translator Project
Provide reliable communication transmission and safeguard the community through the upgrade of telecommunications equipment in a remote valley.
Mitta Mitta$10,000
1st Myrtleford Scout Group
The Scout Association of Australia Victorian Branch
Community is Key
Provide a refuge in times of emergency and boost an organisation's capacity to offer a fit for purpose space through the upgrade of facility.
Myrtleford$24,954
Ramahyuck District Aboriginal CorporationRamahyuck Connection through Art Project
Promote local culture, and support health and social recovery post-bushfires for First Nations people through painting the exterior of the Ramahyuck District Aboriginal Corporation building.
Sale$8,910
Community Centre Swifts Creek IncRoofing Rescue
Improve the amenity of a community centre and create a safe, fit-for-purpose environment through the upgrade of a roof.
Swifts Creek$21,660
Wyeeboo Recreation Reserve Wyeeboo Recreation Reserve - Water Tank
Increase preparedness for future disaster events through the provision of a water tank.
Tallangatta Valley$19,555
Small & Vital
East Gippsland Ceramic Group IncFiring Up
Encourage development of skills and social connection through the purchase of a pottery kiln and wheels.
Bairnsdale$10,000
Bendigo Queer Film FestivalBendigo Queer Film Festival Post-COVID Relaunch
Foster mental health and celebrate local culture and identity for a marginalised group through the delivery of a community film festival.
Bendigo$6,565
Wombat's WishPost-Camp Counselling Sessions
Increase opportunities for bereavement support and improve the health, wellbeing and education outcomes for young people through the initiation of a grief support program.
Drysdale$10,000
Everton Primary SchoolAssisting with Cost of Construction of Outside Decking
Encourage community gathering, and children's learning and development by installing decking at the local primary school.
Everton$10,000
Mittagundi Outdoor Education CentreA Sustainable Kitchen for Mittagundi: Providing Life-Changing Experiences for Young People
Increase connection to the environment and enhance educational experiences for young people through the upgrade of a communal kitchen.
Glen Valley$3,200
Eventide Lutheran HomesGolf Buggy Funding
Support health and wellbeing and encourage positive ageing, through the purchase of a mobility aid.
Hamilton$10,000
The Trustee for The MAC TrustThe Mac Goes Online
Strengthen opportunities for employment, education and social engagement by providing an electronic ticket system for a community-run cinema.
Mansfield$9,000
Murtoa CollegeMurtoa College in Full Swing
Encourage youth engagement and improve health and wellbeing through the installation of specialised playground equipment for senior students.
Murtoa$10,000
Murtoa's Big Weekend
Shared Learning & Activities Murtoa Incorporated
‘Light Up’ Murtoa’s Big Weekend in 2021
Support Murtoa township's economic recovery and strengthen social engagement through the delivery of a community festival.
Murtoa$10,000
Repair Cafe Bellarine
Bellarine Training and Community Hub
Repair Cafe Bellarine
Increase reach of a repair cafe service through the development and delivery of social media and marketing.
Ocean Grove$2,515
Romsey Neighbourhood House IncYOUTHINK
Expand employment opportunities for youth by purchasing a barista machine for hospitality training.
Romsey$9,145
Surf Coast Energy Group (SCEG)Spring Creek Sustainable Futures - Surf Coast, Victoria
Boost the community’s ability to learn about conservation management and increase connection to place through the delivery of community engagement workshops.
Torquay$9,930
Yarrawonga Neighbourhood House IncConnecting our Community through Education and Information
Enhance the delivery of first aid training programs and encourage further education, by purchasing appropriate equipment that reflects real-life medical trauma.
Yarrawonga$9,406
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Small & Vital
Albany Youth Support AssociationSafe Space for Homeless Youth to Sleep in Swags
Increase access to temporary housing for young people sleeping rough by enclosing verandah at emergency accommodation facility.
Albany$7,230
Live To Tell Your Story IncDjinda Ngardak - Making it My Business
Promote healthy lifestyles and improved health and wellbeing while growing opportunities for Indigenous students to pursue careers in hospitality, with week-long cooking skills camp.
Albany$10,000
Enterprise Partnerships WA LimitedPiriwa Place Making Project
Support economic opportunities for Indigenous women while increasing access to affordable clothing with expansion of innovative Op Shop project.
Balgo $10,000
Jarlmadangah Burru Aboriginal CorporationCultural Centre Entrance Improvements
Increase comfort and amenity through refurbishment of Cultural Centre’s entrance with installation of a shade sail.
Derby$9,196
Greenbushes Community Resource CentreThe New You - Working Through Change And Loss
Help people to recover and adapt through delivery of workshop on coping with change and loss.
Greenbushes$1,650
Marble Bar Primary SchoolSTEM Education
Increase engagement in school in remote community through provision of virtual reality equipment to enhance innovative digital arts program.
Marble Bar$9,958
Riding for the Disabled WA Plantagenet Group IncEquipment Maintenance and Safety
Support riding program for children with a disability, with OH&S upgrade of trailer used for transporting riding equipment.
Mt Barker$550
Nungarin Heritage Machinery & Army Museum IncAunty Jim's (re) Store
Enhance authentic historical shop display within the Nungarin Machinery & Army Museum, with new linoleum floor coverings.
Nungarin$6,500
Active Farmers LtdActive Farmers Games WA - Increasing Awareness of the Link Between Physical Activity and Improved Mental Wellbeing
Encourage rural communities to be physically active and more connected with inaugural WA Active Farmers Games.
Torbay$6,340

The Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal (FRRR) has entered a new three-year partnership with the Kellogg Australia Charitable Foundation (KACF).

FRRR partners with the Kellogg Australia Charitable Foundation to help tackle food insecurity

Creating better days for Australians, Kellogg Australia is committed to tackling hunger and helping to create a more sustainable future for generations to come. Now, with the new partnership between KACF and FRRR, their combined efforts can help tackle hunger and build resilience in vulnerable rural and regional communities throughout the country.

Over the course of the partnership, KACF will donate $300,000 to support grants going towards low socio-economic regions in need, and disadvantaged communities facing high levels of food insecurity.

The funds will be part of FRRR’s Strengthening Rural Communities program, which aims to give small remote, rural and regional communities across Australia an opportunity to access funding to strengthen their vitality and resilience. Grants are flexible and respond to community-identified priorities, such as food security. 

In addition to the KACF funding, Kellogg Australia has also put forward in-kind support in the form of food donations, as well as skilled and unskilled volunteering from its employees.

Esme Borgelt, Managing Director Kellogg Australia, said, “The last couple of years have seen so many of our communities facing increasingly difficult times. From droughts to bushfires to a global health pandemic, the impact on everyone has been significant, and those hardest hit have been our remote, rural and regional communities.

“Almost a quarter of Australians experiencing food insecurity live in regional or remote areas and the aim of the KACF partnership with FRRR is to provide support at a grassroots level to help these communities implement innovative, locally led solutions.” 

With FRRR being the only national foundation centred on social and economic strength in remote, rural and regional Australia, the partnership will help to tackle food insecurity with the knowledge and experience of the local needs by local leaders on the ground.

Natalie Egleton, FRRR’s CEO, said, “It’s fantastic to see a leading global food manufacturer like Kellogg’s make it their overarching mission to leave a mark of meaningful difference. We are delighted to be partnering with them to ensure that support reaches vulnerable communities beyond metropolitan boundaries.

“While the grants will be awarded based on locally identified community priorities, there will be a focus on supporting food security initiatives and enterprises, food affordability and food access programs, as well as projects such as community gardens and school and educational food programs,” Ms Egleton explained.

Baryulgil Community Hall

Nestled in the heart of the bush, halfway between Byron Bay and Coffs Harbour in NSW, lies the rural community of Baryulgil.

In the heart of Baryulgil is the Community Hall, located in the town square. The hall has stood for almost 90 years, and been used for social gatherings and fundraisers throughout the years.

With a population of fewer than 100 people, the community hall provides a much-needed place for local residents to gather. In recent years, the hall had fallen into disrepair, with dry rot in the walls, a leaking ceiling and broken windows.

The team at Baryulgil Charity Sports Club applied to FRRR’s Small Grants program, and received a $5,000 grant funded by The Yulgilbar Foundation, to complete maintenance works to ensure the local community could enjoy the hall for many years to come. 

This grant enabled the Club to replace the damaged walls, remove dangerous stairways and doors, replace rusted gutters, and purchase heritage-colour paint to restore windows and doors that had been damaged by water.

Along with the popular social events and fundraisers, the hall can now be used by emergency services during bushfires, acting as a local hub for the NSW Rural Fire Service. The bulk of the project was completed in late 2019, with additional work delayed by COVID-19 to be completed in the near future.

Clarence Landcare Inc

Clarence Landcare is located in regional NSW. Their mission is to promote sustainable land, agriculture, water, vegetation and biodiversity management practices and principles to their local community.

The largely volunteer-run organisation has been taking care of the land in the region for more than two decades. They regularly running community projects and initiatives focused on sustainable land care. The team also hosts workshops at their head office to educate and engage the wider community.

Located in the main street of Grafton, the Clarence Landcare office is in the 100-year-old Dougherty House. After the building was recently repainted giving the exterior of the building new life, it became clear that the interior was in desperate need of an upgrade.

Not only had the furniture been in use for more than 20 years, the team was also lacking basic essentials to help their meetings and workshops run smoothly. There was mismatching furniture and outdated technology made it very difficult for members to join meetings remotely.

The team applied to the FRRR Small Grants for Rural Communities program, and received a $5,000 grant to help them upgrade their workspace. The funding, made possible thanks to The Yulgilbar Foundation, provided improvements such as new blinds, couches, coffee tables, rugs and faux plants, giving new life to the old office.

In addition to the furniture, the funding was also used to purchase some much-needed technology, including a new iPad, Smart TV with a TV stand on wheels, web cam and microphone. This technology has enabled the team to dial into meetings remotely, making it easier for Clarence Landcare staff to stay connected digitally.

“I feel we are heading in a great direction now thanks to this FRRR grant, we don’t need to look like a poverty stricken not-for-profit organisation anymore. We now have the vision and committee support to keep improving our public face of Clarence Landcare. This will really help us gain confidence and attract clientele for future projects. The function of every new piece of equipment has far outweighed the predicted benefits,” said Landcare Officer Debbie Repschlager.

Up to $5,000 available, plus free grantseeker workshops

Gardiner Dairy Foundation, in partnership with the Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR), is inviting community organisations in Victorian dairy regions – Gippsland, northern Victoria and south-west Victoria – to apply for grants of up to $5,000.

The annual Gardiner Dairy Foundation Community Grants Program is delivered through FRRR, which has partnered with Gardiner Dairy Foundation for the past 19 years.

Grants are made available to registered not-for-profit groups and can be used for a wide variety of community activities including community arts, health and wellbeing, environment, infrastructure, education, history and much more.

To assist community groups in preparing their grant applications, Gardiner Dairy Foundation and FRRR are running free grant seeker workshops in each of the three Victorian dairy regions. A webinar will also be hosted. (see details below). These workshops provide invaluable advice on how to put together a competitive grant application.

In 2021 Gardiner Dairy Foundation will make available a total funding pool of $120,000. Since launching the program with FRRR in 2002, Gardiner Dairy Foundation has distributed almost $2 million to Victorian dairy communities and has supported a total of 471projects.

“With better seasonal conditions in most regions, morale in dairy communities has improved over the past 12 months,” said Gardiner Dairy Foundation Chief Executive, Clive Noble. “People can breathe a little easier and now is a good time for community groups to look at some of the projects they may have deferred.

“I’d like to encourage community leaders to take advantage of these grants, to leverage the money available with other inputs and to continue to improve and enrich their dairy communities.

“Strong and vibrant dairy communities are vital to a strong dairy industry and vice versa.”

Sarah Matthee, Acting CEO of FRRR, said that the grants are designed to give dairy communities the boost they may need to make great things happen.

“Last year was tough for most rural communities, and Victorian dairy communities were no exception. We’ve seen from previous grant recipients that a small grant can open doors for further funding, and it will be great to visit some of last year’s grants recipients to see what kind of opportunities have grown from the funding, and how they have used the grants to help address the needs of their communities.

“We know that these communities are determined, inspiring and resilient and full of great ideas. That’s why the Gardiner grants are deliberately flexible – to allow local leaders to respond to what’s happening, and address the biggest priorities. In previous years, that’s been anything from community gardens to festivals, small infrastructure to training. I look forward to seeing what this year’s applications bring.”

Applications for the Gardiner Dairy Foundation Community Grants Program open Monday, 1 February and close Tuesday, 16 March 2020 at 5 pm AEDT.

Grant seeker workshop timetable

Join Gardiner Dairy Foundation and FRRR at one of our free grant seeker workshops. Find out how to put together a competitive grant application.

The webinar will be held:

Date: Thursday 4 February 2021
Time:
12:00pm – 2:00pm
Register at:
https://events.humanitix.com/gardinercommunitygrants

Workshops will be held at:

Warragul
Date:
Monday 8 February 2021
Time:
6:30pm – 9:00pm
Location:
Mercure Hotel, 23 Mason St, Warragul

Colac
Date:
Wednesday 10 February 2021
Time:
10:30am – 1:00pm
Location:
Colac Bowling Club, 4 Armstrong St, Colac

Tallangatta
Date:
Thursday 11 February 2021
Time:
10:30am – 1:00pm
Location: Tallangatta Integrated Community Centre, 33 Towong St, Tallangatta

For more information or to register for the workshops, visit https://frrr.org.au/funding/place/gardiner-communities-grants/.  

Saddleworth in South Australia is a small rural town with a big heart. With less than 500 people, it’s a tight-knit community where the residents easily walk from one end of town to the next in 20 minutes. 

The town has faced some hardships in recent years, making it difficult for locals to access basic recreational sites that larger towns could enjoy easily. With a high number of low-income families living in the area, most without cars, it has become increasingly important to have an accessible and safe playground in Saddleworth for kids to enjoy.   

For over 77 years, the Saddleworth Lawn Tennis Club has been providing the town with facilities for sporting events and recreational activities. The Club is located on the Saddleworth War Memorial Community Centre, and honours those who lost their lives in World War II. The Club features the only publically accessible playground in the area, providing play and entertainment for nearby families. 

The small playground that was in desperate need of an upgrade, as the equipment was becoming non-compliant, and was at risk of being removed entirely. The playground was also sitting in direct sunlight, making it difficult for kids to enjoy playing on hot days when UV levels were extraordinarily high. 

After losing their local supermarket to a fire in 2016, the community was feeling deflated, having lost a major asset to their town. However, when the Club decided to fundraise the amount needed to improve the playground, over 20 volunteers put their hands up to help out, and six local businesses offered their support. 

The team applied for the FRRR Small Grants for Rural Communities grant, which provided $5,000 for stage one of the playground upgrade. These funds paid for a new shade cover the playground, that will ensure kids can continue to enjoy the area even on sunny days, and not just the early morning or late afternoons as they had become accustom to. 

Stage two of the upgrade encompassed replacing some of the equipment on the playground, including a garden border, softfall and bench for families to enjoy, while they sit under the shade sail. The work was carried out by local volunteers. The community can now enjoy their local playground and the newly refurbished facilities.

With summer well under way, the Club has more Junior Teams attending, with more children looking for some entertainment while their siblings play tennis. The new playground is enjoyed by locals and visitors alike, and has created a real impact amongst the community.

When faced with the heartbreaking reality of rising deaths among young people, the team at Byron Youth Service (BYS) stepped in to remind their community that young lives matter, and that everyone deserves to feel happy, safe and valued. 

Since 1987, BYS has been advocating for young people between the ages of 12 to 24 years old, by creating, supporting and leading community action. Made up of a team of eight staff and ten volunteers, BYS has been the primary provider of youth services in Byron Bay and the surrounding area since their inception. 

Sadly, for many disadvantaged and at-risk students in the area, there is no access to computers or the internet at home. Having access to the right information and support can help these students overcome issues such as mental health, substance misuse, self-harm, sexual assaults and eating disorders. 

Among one of their many projects, the team at BYS runs Mullumbimby Cottage, where up to 40 disadvantaged students access outreach programs using modern technology, that are designed to build resilience and create a sense of place. The programs on offer at the Cottage provide skills training and facilities that help support and empower young people to overcome the challenges they may face. 

Being able to discuss the issues they’re facing without fear of shame, fear or embarrassment is key in building resilience – and BYS has found that delivering programs using technology can support better outcomes than traditional methods might. 

The laptops at Mullumbimby Cottage allow BYS to run information sessions, show videos, and educate participants on safe social media privacy settings. In both individual and group settings, laptops allow youth workers to provide the support needed to disclose any issues or concerns young people have, in a safe and trusting environment. 

And, after using the same computers to access these programs for over a decade, Mullumbimby Cottage needed a major technology upgrade. Through FRRR’s ANZ Seeds of Renewal program, BYS received a grant for $6,895, which allowed them to purchase five new Apple MacBooks. In addition to having access to the programs BYS run, the new laptops are also available for writing resumes, searching for jobs, researching courses and completing homework. 

The contribution Byron Youth Services has made to their local community is incredibly important, and FRRR is proud to support Mullumbimby Cottage on their mission to help every young person reach their full potential.

Situated 55 km east of Adelaide is the small rural community of Mount Pleasant. Mount Pleasant acts as a hub for a range of nearby smaller towns including Springton, Eden Valley, Cromer, Birdwood, Palmer, Tungkillo, and Cambrai. The town contains services that cater for the region, such as a public library, a kindergarten and primary school, a hospital, supplies stores, and a post office.

Mount Pleasant is a thriving and innovative community, that holds local events that bring people together, like a monthly Community Dinner, the Annual Mount Pleasant Agricultural Show, and a weekly farmers market. The flourishing community hosts a number of local groups and service clubs and the region also encompasses a number of successful farming and agriculture small businesses.

Established in 2000, the Mount Pleasant Natural Resource Centre Inc (MPNRC) is an active local organisation that works to promote environmental awareness, sustainability and best-practice land management. The community centre provides a significant gathering and activity space and proactively seeks to generate increased visitation, economic opportunities, new jobs and a sense of community for Mt Pleasant residents.

The energy and enthusiasm of volunteers’ play are a big part in MPNRC’s success with nearly 60 active volunteers currently involved with the centre.

Wanting to foster this passion for community engagement, MPNRC realised that their workspace needed a revamp so that it could be bigger, brighter and more inviting, increasing the workshop capacity and volunteer workspace to make it into a safer, all-weather environment.

With a $4,800 grant from the Small Grants for Rural Communities program, collaboratively funded by individual donors, and the enthusiastic assistance of volunteers, MPNRC’s refurbishment of The Share Shed (as the locals call it) saw the community and tradespeople join forces to weatherproof, install, refit, replace, repurpose the shared workspace.

The new space has had a positive ripple-effect throughout the community. The revamped Share Shed has hosted a number of community upcycling workshops, including school workshops, and Mount Pleasant’s inaugural Makers in the Garden Market. MPNRC’s fundraising sales have increased and the expanded volunteer space means the Centre’s volunteer numbers have increased and MPNRC been able to employ four additional staff members.

Sharing with FRRR just how impactful The Share Shed project has been for the Mount Pleasant community, Faye McGoldrick, MPNRC Coordinator expressed MPNRC’s gratitude and said: “Thankyou – this project means a lot to our volunteers and community. It is fantastic to find funding to expand and build on projects that enable us to increase our community support and engagement.”

The challenge of attracting volunteers to support charitable organisations serving the community is universal, but exacerbated further in remote communities where the potential pool from which to recruit helpers is that much smaller to start with.

This was the challenge NT Friendship & Support Inc (NTSF) faced when they received a grant from FRRR to help them with their volunteer recruitment drive. The group’s mission is to provide professional care and promote an accessible, inclusive and supportive community.

The organisation has a waiting list of vulnerable Katherine region seniors seeking to be paired with a volunteer to assist them, from attending medical appointments and support services, to simply joining them for a cup of tea and a chat. Community members access the service via a referral from a regional assessment team and to be eligible must be 65 year or older, or 45 years or older for Indigenous community members.

Katherine currently has three aged care facilities, all of which are at capacity, with the only other alternative residential aged care facility located 330 km away in Darwin. NTFS has 25 people on the waiting list, five of whom are a high priority for the service. These identified seniors are at risk of isolation and loss of independence. Research suggests that, whenever possible, it is important that people have the opportunity to remain in their communities, connected to country, and independent as long as possible.

NTFS had hoped to recruit and train ten new volunteers, and used the $4,090 grant from FRRR’s Small Grants for Rural Communities program, funded by The Yulgilbar Foundation, to run an advertising campaign to increase their volunteer numbers. Katherine has a transient population which includes the RAAF base at Tindal, and the town relies on families from Tindal to be able to fill vacancies of volunteer positions.

Sadly, the recruitment drive wasn’t nearly as successful as they were hoping, due largely in part to the low turnover of families at Tindal. Of the initial 13 people who registered their interest in volunteering with NTFS, for various reasons, this translated into only two new volunteers.

Part of the grant was supposed to cover the cost of National Police clearance, Ochre Card Cultural training and First Aid certification for up to ten people (the magic number they were hoping to recruit). NTFS found themselves with surplus funds, so after seeking approval for a variation to their grant agreement, they applied the funding to another of their initiatives, the Seniors Community Bus, to ensure Seniors are supported through the COVID-19 crisis.

With no public transport available in Katherine, this service enables the organisation to support Seniors in getting to and from local services and various medical appointments, unhindered by the cost of high fees on taxis when they are available. The bus adheres to social distancing requirements (5 passengers as a maximum in a 14 seater bus), with rigorous hygiene and disinfection control measures in place.

So while the NTFS team and volunteers are stretched to their limits, they continue to provide valuable and necessary services to marginalised and vulnerable members of their community.

Shooting Stars is a unique program, formed by Netball WA and Glass Jar Australia in 2014. It uses netball as a vehicle for empowering young Aboriginal women living in remote WA to improve their school attendance rates, while promoting health and wellbeing.

Shooting Stars aims to drive social change and close the gap created by gender imbalance in Indigenous support programs. Less than 30% of Aboriginal girls complete year 12, and the importance of the link between education and employment is well documented.

Participation in the program is incentivised with the opportunity to be rewarded with attendance to a camp and this has a huge impact on the success of the overall program delivery. Girls must meet the Shooting Star program benchmarks – either maintain an 80% or above attendance rate or show an improvement of 20% or more from the previous term, and exhibit exemplary behaviour in class.

“Being accepted onto the camp empowers these girls to feel that if they work hard, anything is possible.”

Funding of $5,000 from Round 33 of FRRR’s Small Grants program contributed to the Confident Me Cultural Rewards Camp held in Meekatharra in June 2019. Thirty girls, aged between 13 and 18 years, travelled On Country with Elder Noeleen Gilla, who led cooking and art activities. The cooking activity led to an engaged discussion around health eating habits and what the girls could do to better support their health and wellbeing by making healthy choices about what food they consume. The Confident Me workshop, a part of the Dove Self Esteem project, was a major component of the camp, and helped the girls focus on self-esteem and confidence, learning about media literacy, body image in the media, and how to manage social pressures. The camp culminated in a yarning circle about their experience of the camp, “They shared ideas in a safe, culturally appropriate environment and learned from one another and from camp facilitators.” The yarns are recorded and transcribed for evaluation of the camp. As you can see, the Camp is much more than a netball program!

“We are most proud that we are able to reward Shooting Stars for their improved attendance and behaviour at school. By supporting them to make positive choices throughout the school year we were able to reinforce their success through the Reward Camp, showing them that their hard work is valued.”

Melanie McKee, Community Investment Coordinator, 2019