Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal

Suncorp Group today pledged $1 million to FRRR for a dedicated program to support rural Australian communities impacted by significant natural disasters.

FRRR and Suncorp launch $1 million disaster recovery partnership

The first Rebuilding Futures program grant round opens today and closes on 15 September, with $200,000 available through grants of up to $15,000 each for local community groups and not-for-profits in areas impacted by flooding in March 2021. Successful grants will be announced in November 2021.

Natalie Egleton, CEO of FRRR said the Foundation is delighted to be partnering with the Suncorp Group on the dedicated funding initiative.

“From our many years working alongside communities as they recover from natural disasters, we have learnt that recovery is a marathon and local community groups and not-for-profits need funding for diverse recovery initiatives, as their needs evolve over time,” Ms Egleton said.

Suncorp Group CEO Steve Johnston launched the first round of grants to help NSW and Queensland communities impacted by flooding in March 2021.

“These communities are dealing not only with COVID-19, but the significant impacts of flooding,” Mr Johnston said.

“I’ve seen first-hand the devastation and emotional toll of natural disasters, which is why we are supporting affected communities to not just build back but to make themselves more resilient than before.

“As an insurer and bank our job is to help our customers to physically and financially rebuild, but we know the full recovery process continues for years after people are back in their homes. Through our long-term relationships with customers across Australia we see the importance of supporting wellbeing and the lasting value of a community’s spirit.

“Communities are best placed to steer their own future which is why these grants empower locals to come together to identify and design local solutions.”

FRRR facilitates funding and capacity building at the local level. It has the relationships and know-how to distribute grants to fund community-led solutions that build resilience and long-term viability of remote, rural, and regional communities across Australia.

“This program, with a focus on the medium to long-term needs and building back better, will mean that when there are significant disasters, the support will be available for local groups to address issues that are important to recovery, to rebuilding the sense of place that is often so badly damaged through events like the floods we saw in NSW earlier this year,” Ms Egleton said.

Grantseeker Workshop

To support community groups and not-for-profit organisations in the eligible remote, rural, and regional communities impacted by the Storm and Flood events of March 2021 to develop their grant applications FRRR will hold a free online grantseeker workshop. The interactive session will provide key program information and helpful tips on how to apply for a grant.

The workshop will take place on Wednesday, 25 August, 1:00pm to 2:30pm AEST.

Attendance is free, but people are asked to register at: https://events.humanitix.com/suncorp-rebuilding-futures-grantseeker-workshop.

For more information contact Danielle Griffin or Fiona Bradshaw at info@frrr.org.au or on 1800 170 020.

More information on the Suncorp Rebuilding Futures grant program is available here.

Supporting capacity of organisations in Victoria’s bushfire-impacted communities

FRRR has announced a multi-year partnership with the Helen Macpherson Smith Trust (HMSTrust) and the Sidney Myer Fund to build the capacity of local organisations playing a central, coordinating or networking role in the recovery of Victorian communities affected by the 2019/20 bushfires.

New partnership backs community-led recovery

The Bushfire Recovery Fund will award grants of up to $90,000 to community groups and local not-for-profit organisations working in Victorian fire-affected regions. The program will fund initiatives that enhance, improve or sustain operations of these keystone organisations for up to three years, and therefore strengthen community-led recovery over the medium and long-term.

Natalie Egleton, CEO of FRRR, said that the partnership is a result of a shared vision for aligning funding and support to community-led solutions that build resilience and continued viability and vitality.

“FRRR and our generous donor partners HMSTrust and the Sidney Myer Fund have come together to help local groups to be more viable, resilient, and sustainable. The program is designed to help address organisational needs, and strengthen capacity to adapt and respond to the changing or emerging needs of communities.

“FRRR’s role will be to act as a facilitator, to encourage and support these community groups so that they can continue to do the work that is so important to the ongoing recovery of their communities,” Ms Egleton said.

HMSTrust Executive Officer Lin Bender said that the Trust believes the key program goal of building organisational capacity is critical to ensuring local groups can operate in what are challenging economic, emotional, and ecological conditions.

“By supporting applicants that are deeply engaged with their communities to sustain or adapt their model or way of working, we aim to ensure more viable, resilient and sustainable organisations that can support ongoing recovery efforts,” Lin said.

Sidney Myer Fund CEO Leonard Vary said the broader intent of the program is to inform disaster recovery best practice by understanding and addressing the needs of critical community ‘backbone’ organisations.

“The capacity to manage normal day-to-day operations along with the demands of recovery has been identified as a challenge for many organisations in bushfire-affected communities,” Mr Vary said. “By engaging directly with these organisations, we can facilitate and fund not only the development of locally relevant, multi-year projects that build capacity and resilience but potentially identify new approaches to long-term community recovery.”

To reduce the burden on potential applicants, a shortlist of organisations from declared fire affected areas in Victoria, identified through broad stakeholder consultation, will be invited to apply for funding. The first successful grantees are expected to be announced in October 2021. Organisations who consider this opportunity to be aligned to their situation should contact FRRR to discuss their needs.

More information about the program can be found here.

FRRR acknowledges the devastating effects that Cyclone Seroja has had on a number of remote communities across Western Australia.

Cyclone Seroja

Natalie Egleton, FRRR’s CEO, said that the Foundation knows recovery for these impacted communities has only just begun, with reconnection of power an immediate priority, and the rebuilding damaged houses, farms and public assets to occur in the months and years ahead.

“We also anticipate that the activities of local community groups, which are so vital to the ongoing fabric of Western Australia’s remote, rural and regional communities, will be significantly impacted. But we also know these groups will play a vital role in supporting their community through the recovery journey.

“FRRR encourages any donors interested in assisting these affected communities to donate to charities registered with the ACNC, and to consider supporting the needs of communities through the medium-long term recovery journey, in addition to their more immediate needs,” Ms Egleton said.

FRRR has a long history of assisting communities to recover from disasters. We have facilitated support to communities recovering from the recent NSW floods; the 2019-20 Black Summer bushfires; 2019 North Queensland floods; Cyclones Debbie (2017), Oswald (2013), Yasi (2011) and Larry (2006); the 2013 Blue Mountains bushfires; the Victorian Black Saturday bushfires of 2009; and ongoing droughts; and to those places preparing for future disaster events.

“More frequent and intense climate disasters means that Australia needs to be proactive in how we fund communities to assist with their preparedness activities, and to have funds available to support them through the medium to long term aftermath of a disaster.” Ms Egleton explained.

Any funds donated to FRRR to support WA communities affected by Cyclone Seroja will be allocated through the following two key mechanisms:

  • FRRR’s Strengthening Rural Communities program, which is open all year round, and assessed quarterly. Grants of up to $10,000 will be distributed; OR
  • FRRR’s Disaster Resilience and Recovery Fund (DRRF). The DRRF was initiated in August 2019, in response to an increasing frequency of disasters. FRRR wanted to ensure it had a corpus of funds invested, so that it can provide some support to disaster impacted communities whether they’re large or small, in the public eye for a long time or swallowed by other events, or are well-supported philanthropically, or not. Donations made to FRRR’s DRRF are pooled and invested, making it a gift that keeps giving, with earnings drawn off every year to be distributed to communities impacted by disaster through grants in programs such as Strengthening Rural Communities. The DRRF currently holds over $4M, which is invested. FRRR will provide support to community groups recovering from the impacts of the cyclone over the coming years, by applying a portion of the earnings from this fund.

FRRR welcomes donations to either of these mechanisms. All donations over $2 are tax deductible in Australia.

Beyond FRRR, the Foundation encourages everyone to consider the impact that this cyclone has had on many individuals and communities across WA, and consider giving to a DGR-1 endorsed ACNC registered charity, which can support individuals and their communities through the recovery journey.

For more information, contact Sarah Matthee, FRRR’s General Manager, Partnerships and Services.

More than $250,000 distributed to impacted regions

FRRR, in partnership with News Corp Australia, has awarded $279,940 in grants to support 12 projects in communities impacted by the Black Summer bushfires, some of whom are now facing the complexity of recovery from multiple disasters.

News Corp Bushfire Fund grants
SAVEM Inc in Onkaparinga, SA was awarded a $21,050 grant in September 2020 for their Field Hospital Essential Equipment Project

Funded through the News Corp Bushfire Fund, grants ranging from $15,000 to $25,000 have been awarded to community groups in fire-affected regions across New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Queensland.

The funding will go toward community initiatives that support infrastructure rebuilding and social recovery, such as helping people connect; alleviating pressure on volunteers; or critical upgrades to communities’ facilities, activity that will build community capacity and preparedness for future disasters.

Natalie Egleton, CEO of FRRR, explained that several of the recipient communities are now dealing with floods, which makes it all the more important to support them and get this funding on the ground.

“Local not-for-profit organisations and community groups are responding to complex and intersecting challenges. The recovery of many bushfire-affected communities was significantly hampered by COVID-19 restrictions and many are only now starting to make inroads,” Ms Egleton said.

“Some communities are also navigating the ongoing impact of drought while in other areas, the recent flooding will add further to the complexity. However, the underlying issues that these projects were seeking to address will still be there, so these grants are critical to continuing recovery.

“Where project challenges arise due to the flooding, we will work closely with these communities to ensure they are supported to adapt their plans and deliver on the goals they have for local recovery. 

“It’s wonderful to partner with an organisation like News Corp Australia, who have committed support to these fire affected communities over the last year that has allowed us to be flexible and respond as different needs emerge and the recovery journey evolves,” Ms Egleton explained.

News Corp Australia’s community ambassador, Penny Fowler, said the strength of these fire-affected communities is truly inspiring.

“Many of the communities supported with this funding have felt the effect of multiple natural disasters over the last few years – whether drought, flood or fires – yet they continue to move forward. The importance of having well-equipped community facilities that enable people to come together to support one another, or to get back to some semblance of ‘normal’ came through really strongly this round,” Ms Fowler said.

“We are very pleased to be able to work with FRRR to ensure that those community groups on the ground, doing the heavy lifting and supporting their people, have what they need to continue to do so.”

Some of the projects funded include:

  • Container of Dreams Limited – Drake, NSW – Covered Work Area for Tiny House Building – $25,000 – Build an undercover work area, so that no matter the weather conditions, volunteers can safely build tiny houses for those still homeless following the fires.
  • Upper Murray Innovation Foundation / Thowgla Community Recovery Committee – Thowgla Valley, VIC – Thowgla Valley Fire Preparedness – $23,095 – Improve the community’s preparedness to respond to future fire events, and other disasters, by purchasing portable fire-fighting equipment and UHF radios, strengthening community resilience.
  • Granite Belt Art and Craft Trail Incorporated – Stanthorpe, QLD – Granite Belt Art and Craft Trail – $25,000 – Employ a coordinator to address volunteer fatigue and enable the ongoing delivery of a largely volunteer-run art events program to help drive local engagement and attract tourists.
  • Mount Torrens and Districts Community Association Incorporated – Mount Torrens, SA – Dunnfield Community Space – $25,000 – Increase community connections by creating a playground, reflection and meeting spaces, and a community garden in the Dunnfield Community Space using timber from the fire ground.

FRRR encourages all grant seekers to subscribe to our eNews and social media channels to be alerted when other funding opportunities are announced, and to be inspired to develop their own community-led projects.

Visit here for more information on FRRR’s grant programs to support communities before, during, and after a natural disaster or drought, and build communities’ climate resilience. Anyone wanting to directly support medium to long-term flood recovery can do so at https://frrr.org.au/giving/flood-recovery-appeal/.

A full list of grant recipients and their projects are below.

OrganisationProject LocationGrant
NEW SOUTH WALES
Blicks Community IncorporatedCommunity Action Plan: Rebuilding Together - Our Sustainable Environment
Enable the community to recover from bushfires and better prepare for future emergencies by developing an Environmental Sustainability plan.
Dundurrabin$25,000
Broulee Surfers Surf Life Saving Club IncorporatedKitchen Renovation
Improve the club's ability to support and service the community during times of emergency through kitchen renovations at the club house.
Broulee$25,000
Container of Dreams LimitedCovered Work Area for Tiny House Building
Improve the capability of Container of Dreams by building an undercover work area allowing volunteers to build tiny houses in all weather conditions for displaced community members.
Drake$25,000
Eden Community Access Centre IncorporatedPower for the People
Enhance the efficiency of the Eden Community Access Centre by installing solar electricity to support the reduction of running costs and provide a more reliable power source during times of emergency.
Eden$22,500
Melanoma and Skin Cancer Advocacy Network Limited (BlazeAid)Bushfire Recovery: Keeping Volunteers Sun Safe and Skin Serious!
Improve BlazeAid's capability to protect volunteer health by providing broad brimmed sun hats to be worn when they are supporting the rebuild of community infrastructure.
Cobargo$15,000
Southcoast Health and Sustainability AllianceMaking the Moruya Pre-School Kindergarten a Heatwave and Bushfire Haven for Young Children and Their Parents
Improve the Moruya Pre-School's ability to prepare their facility to protect young families of the community by upgrading fire defence systems and installing solar electricity at the centre.
Moruya$25,000
The Big Scrub OrchestraRebuilding Lives of Children Experiencing Trauma from the 2019/20 Bushfires with Music
Encourage children's recovery and learning through music by providing access to big band music experience in the Richmond Valley region.
Rappville$25,000
QUEENSLAND
Granite Belt Art and Craft Trail IncorporatedGranite Belt Art and Craft Trail
Boost the capability of Granite Belt Art and Craft Trail Incorporated to deliver art events across the Granite Belt region by employing an event coordinator locally.
Stanthorpe$25,000
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
Kingston Brigade Lecepede CFS GroupLacepede CFS Wellbeing Retreat and Learning Zone Development
Strengthen and support the volunteer fire brigade crew to reduce stress and increase community safety during emergencies by providing a breakout space including learning area for volunteers.
Kingston$25,000
Mount Torrens and Districts Community Association IncorporatedDunnfield Community Space
Help locals recover and reflect by providing a community space including playground and community garden constructed with trees recycled from local fire grounds of the 2019/20 bushfires.
Mount Torrens$25,000
VICTORIA
Tambo Upper Primary SchoolHistorical Hall Kitchen Rebuild
Expand the use of the community hall by upgrading the kitchen to provide a well-appointed facility for the community to use, particularly during times of emergency.
Tambo Upper$19,345
Upper Murray Innovation Foundation - Thowgla Community Recovery Committee (CRC)Thowgla Valley Fire Preparedness
Improve the community's ability to respond to future fire events by providing portable firefighting equipment and radios for the Thowgla Valley.
Thowgla Valley$23,095

Community Foundations and local organisations encouraged to apply

FRRR is asking Community Foundations and local organisations in places impacted by the 2019-20 bushfires to assist with the distribution of vouchers to families in need of support as part of its long-running Back to School (BTS) program.

FRRR seeks Back to School partners in bushfire-affected areas

FRRR is currently seeking local partners to help distribute more than $500,000 in $50 gift vouchers into areas affected by the Black Summer bushfires. Families will be able to redeem the vouchers for school essentials, such as school uniforms, shoes, school bags and stationery.

The aim of the BTS program is to help students by providing the key items they need, which may have been lost during the bushfires, so that they can focus on their education and keep learning.

As part of the BTS program, FRRR partners with community groups and Community Foundations who can discretely distribute the vouchers to local families in need. This means parents don’t have to apply for the vouchers but still receive support.

More than 5,400 students have already been given a helping hand this year, with vouchers valued at more than $250,000 having been distributed to families in places affected by the Black Summer bushfires, thanks to the generosity of donors from across Australia.

Jeanice Henderson, BTS Program Coordinator, said that while $50 dollars may not seem much, in FRRR’s experience, it makes a practical difference, especially for those who may have lost everything during the fires.

“For families and students impacted by the 2019-20 bushfires, recovery is already a difficult journey. These vouchers will mean they have a helping hand when it comes to covering the costs of things like books, stationery, or winter uniforms and shoes,” Ms Henderson explained.

“We are grateful to the Community Foundations and local organisations that have partnered with us so far as part of the BTS program. These organisations know the challenges that locals face when it comes to disaster recovery and can reach those families and students most in need of support.

“We hope other local organisations, which we know are already doing amazing work to support families like these in their communities, will come on board to help distribute our BTS vouchers,” Ms Henderson said.

Community Foundations and local not-for-profit community organisations can apply for vouchers via the Back to School page.

Applications close Wednesday, 31 March 2021. Grants will be announced, and vouchers distributed, in late May 2021, ahead of Term 3.

Visit here for more information on FRRR’s Back to School program and other grant programs to support communities before, during, and after a natural disaster or drought, and build communities’ climate resilience.

Black Saturday funding available for community-led initiatives

Twelve years on from the devastating 2009 Victorian bushfires, FRRR is offering another round of funding to support impacted communities as they continue to rebuild, reconnect and recover.

Black Saturday funding available for community-led initiatives
Whittlesea Community Garden

Supported by the Victorian Bushfire Appeal Fund (VBAF), the funding is available through FRRR’s Grants for Resilience & Wellness (GR&W) program and the Grants for Resilience & Wellness Kinglake Ranges (GR&W Kinglake) program. The grants of up to $20,000 will support not-for-profits and community-based organisations to lead projects that aid recovery and build community resilience.

The GR&W and GR&W Kinglake Ranges programs fund initiatives that:

  • Improve mental health and wellbeing of communities and individuals;
  • Enhance wellbeing and resilience of pre-school, primary and secondary school-aged children and young people;
  • Strengthen community connections, sense of place and community identity; and
  • Increase the community’s ability to prepare for future disasters.

To date, FRRR has awarded more than $4.5 million in grants to local groups, thanks to VBAF funding, which comes from the generous contributions by the general public following the Black Saturday bushfires in 2009. Through this round of funding there is a total of $360,000 available for GR&W grants and a total of more than $700,000 available for GR&W Kinglake projects.

Nina O’Brien, FRRR’s Disaster Resilience and Recovery Lead, said that the impact of COVID-19 has increased the need to support recovering communities to reconnect socially and continue to enhance their wellbeing.

“Despite the restrictions that the pandemic has put on people coming together, local groups report services and activities that enhance wellness and resilience are still well attended. One program funded twice previously by FRRR, the Be Well in the Ranges program, has been fully booked out, and the Yinnar Memorial Hall exercise group continues to attract 30-40 participants each week,” Ms O’Brien said.

“The GR&W programs provide flexible support to respond to issues as they emerge. More than a decade since the fires, communities are focusing on building resilience for the future,” Ms O’Brien explained.

Applications for both GR&W and GR&W Kinglake close at 5pm AEDT, Wednesday 21 April 2021.

Potential applicants should visit the GR&W and GR&W Kinglake webpages and review the guidelines before applying.

FRRR has awarded $642,481 in grants for 36 projects that will help seed and strengthen the recovery of regions impacted by the Black Summer bushfires, through its Strengthening Rural Communities (SRC) program.

Bushfire recovery grants awarded

The bushfire recovery stream provides grants up to $25,000 for projects that promote community healing and the renewal of remote, rural, and regional communities following the 2019/2020 bushfires.

Grants range from $2,953 to help the New South Wales’ Burragate community prepare for future disasters, through to a $25,000 grant to increase access to mental health support for community members across five bushfire impacted communities in South Australia.

Natalie Egleton, CEO of FRRR, said that over the past year rural people have demonstrated the true meaning of resilience and determination and continued to find ways of addressing the needs of their communities.

“Recovery in bushfire-affected regions has been hampered by COVID-19 restrictions, but local organisations are still seeking to do what they can to meet the local priorities in their community.

“This round we saw an increase in requests to fund projects that will provide access to services and activities as impacted communities begin to resume normal activities and reconnect one year on from the fires. This includes Tenterfield in NSW, where a series of creative workshops will support the social and mental health of locals.

“Improving and repairing infrastructure is also an important part of the recovery process for many of these communities. These meeting places, like Katanning’s central shopping precinct in Western Australia and the local Hall in Charleston, South Australia, played a vital role during the bushfires, providing the community with a safe place to gather during the fires, or as a space to gather in order to reconnect and seek support after the disaster,” Ms Egleton explained.

Some of the 36 projects awarded include:

  • Bermagui Preschool Co-operative Society Limited, NSW – The Cobargo/Bermagui Growing-Growers Project 2021 with Cost Georgiadis & Paul West – $25,000 – Increase social connectedness and local food security, through delivery of collaborative preschool garden activities and Costa Georgiadis events.
  • Stanthorpe and Granite Belt Community Radio Association Inc, QLD – Stanthorpe Community Radio Transmission Equipment – $9,773 – Increase communication of local news, events and emergency information, by supporting the establishment of a community radio station.
  • Penneshaw Progress Association Inc, SA – Penneshaw Town Hall Evacuation Centre – Catering Facilities – $25,000 – Increase preparedness for future disaster events by upgrading the kitchen at the Penneshaw Town Hall.
  • Corryong Neighbourhood House Inc, VIC – Giving Youth a Voice – $25,000 – Increase youth representation in community recovery and development, through employment of youth workers to support youth leadership in the Upper Murray.
  • Shire of Katanning, WA – Vibrant Katanning – $22,000 – Support economic and social recovery, through upgrading Katanning’s central shopping precinct.

The SRC program is collaboratively-funded and offers two streams of funding. In addition to the $642,481 in bushfire recovery funding, $420,003 in grants has been awarded via the program’s Small & Vital grants stream.

The SRC program is collaboratively supported by a number of generous donors, which are listed on FRRR’s website – https://frrr.org.au/funding/place/strengthening-rural-communities/.

The next round of SRC applications is currently being assessed and will be announced June 2021. The current round is accepting applications until 25 May 2021, with funds to be awarded in December

Visit here for more information on FRRR’s Strengthening Rural Communities program and other grant programs to support communities before, during, and after a natural disaster or drought, and build communities’ climate resilience.

To support grants like this through FRRR, make a tax-deductible donation at frrr.org.au/giving/.

A full list of grant recipients and their projects are below.

Jump to: NSW | QLD | SA | VIC | WA

OrganisationProjectLocationGrant
NEW SOUTH WALES
Bega Valley Meals on Wheels Co-operative LtdBega Valley Mobile Community Freezer
Increase food security, including for future disasters, through the purchase of a mobile freezer.
Bega$16,000
Bermagui Area Chamber of Commerce & Tourism IncKeeping Bermagui Connected & Safe
Boost communication capacity during and before natural disaster disasters through the purchase of wireless computer and printer equipment, and re-establishing signage for the 17km Heritage Trail.
Bermagui$15,373
Bermagui Pre School Co-operative Society LimitedThe Cobargo/Bermagui Growing-Growers Project 2021 with Costa Georgiadis & Paul West
Increase social connectedness and local food security in fire-affected community, through delivery of collaborative preschool garden activities and Costa Georgiadis events.
Bermagui$25,000
Burragate Rural Fire ServiceOffice Equipment for the Burragate Fire Shed
Boost the community's ability to prepare for future disasters by purchasing computer and office supplies to support Burragate Rural Fire Service.
Burragate$2,953
Delegate Progress Association Inc.Recovery BBQ
Support community connection and recovery by installing an electric barbeque at Memorial Park to host community barbeques and debrief events for the bushfire-affected community.
Delegate$15,000
Eden Mountain Bike Club IncEden Community Access Centre IncorporatedEden Mountain Bike Trails
Design a community-driven mountain bike trail in the Eden region to support economic recovery, through development of Environmental Impact Study and Concept Plans.
Eden$25,000
Eungai Hall Section 355 Committee of ManagemenNambucca Valley CouncilKitchen Upgrade for Community Use and Resilience
Expand the use of the Community Hall by upgrading the kitchen facilities to allow for more community events and activities to occur.
Eungai Creek$12,441
Ewingar TheatricksClarence Valley CouncilTheatrical Production
Support the community's recovery by bringing people together to deliver a locally-set play.
Ewingar$14,460
Glen Innes Severn CouncilWytaliba Rises Sustainable Community Music Events
Encourage people to come together and support recovery by providing equipment for music events.
Die Hard Wytaliba$9,267
Glenrac IncorporatedProviding Homes for our Hollow Nesting Species
Encourage local species back to their habitat following the bushfires, through the creation of nesting boxes at facilitated workshops.
Glen Innes$19,756
Granite Borders Landcare Committee IncorporatedReconnecting Communities - Workshops Focusing on Health and Wellbeing for Fire-Affected Villages in the Tenterfield LGA
Reduce social isolation and support community recovery, through the delivery of workshops in remote towns across the Tenterfield Shire.
Tenterfield$25,000
Lawrence Historical Society IncorporatedWorkshop for Sharing, Supporting and Skills
Support community recovery and increase volunteer engagement at Lawrence Historical Society by building a new workshop shed.
Lawrence$15,820
Make a Difference PMQ IncorporatedM.A.D. Mobile Food Van
Increase capacity to support outreach to homeless and vulnerable populations in fire-affected communities, through fitout of a mobile food van and construction of an event stage.
Port Macquarie$25,000
Make It Tenterfield IncorporatedCreativity Abound Workshops
Support social and mental health recovery through the delivery of creative and supportive community-based workshops.
Tenterfield$24,000
Marlee Rural Fire BrigadeMarlee Safer Place Upgrade
Increase preparedness for future disasters, through upgrade to central meeting space to create a Neighbourhood Safer Place for the community.
Marlee$15,205
Mingoola Hall Management CommitteeBringing Mingoola Community Together to Celebrate our Uniquely Beautiful Environment
Strengthen community connection and recovery in Mingoola via the delivery of the inaugural Mingoola Big River Picnic event.
Mingoola$10,000
Monaro Early Intervention Service IncorporatedWheelchair Access to Sensory Garden
Improved access to sensory garden to support wellbeing of children affected by fires, through construction of a ramp at early intervention service.
Cooma$19,000
Nowendoc Ladies AuxileryKeep us Fit and Healthy
Increase health, wellbeing and individual recovery, through delivery of weekly exercise sessions for ageing community members in Nowendoc.
Nowendoc$12,000
Nowendoc Memorial Hall Land ManagerSave us from Frosty Toes and Nose!
Increase comfort and amenity at the Nowendoc Memorial Hall to support community recovery, through the installation of air conditioning.
Nowendoc$25,000
Nymboida P&C AssociationEstablish a Nymboida Community Kitchen by Upgrading the Nymboida P&C Kitchen Facilities to Complement the Nymboida PS Community Vegetable Garden
Increase capacity to cater for school and community recovery and preparedness activities, through the upgrade of the school kitchen/canteen area at Nymboida School.
Nymboida$25,000
Rotary Club of GuyraGuyra Garden ClubThe Guyra Spring Flower Festival 2021 incorporating a Memorial Avenue and a Mandala Garden
Deliver the inaugural annual 'Guyra Spring Flower Festival' in 2021 and plant a Memorial Avenue and Mandala Garden to honour service people.
Guyra$10,000
Wilsons Creek Community Hall IncPrepare, Respond and Recover - Wilsons Creek, Huonbrook, & Wanganui
Increase preparedness for future disasters through resourcing and upgrading the local hall as a local evacuation centre.
Wilsons Creek$23,078
Wingham Showground Land ManagerAcknowledging our Heritage, Respecting our Future
Strengthen sense of place and connectedness during recovery by erecting four billboards displaying historically significant photographs of the Showgrounds.
Wingham$5,920
QUEENSLAND
Atherton Men's Shed IncorporatedEnlarging Atherton Men's Shed Space
Support local men, and projects benefiting the wider community, through expansion of Atherton Men's Shed workspace.
Atherton$9,000
Charters Towers Rural Fire BrigadeInteractive Screen for Training
Increased rural fire brigade's ability to deliver training and presentations, through the purchase of an interactive screen.
Charters Towers$6,435
Creative Recovery NetworkDisaster Ready Regions - CQRASN 'Shine Bright' Creative Recovery Training
Boost community's ability to recover from disasters through creative recovery training for practitioners and community leaders.
Bundaberg$20,000
Friends of Amamoor IncAmamoor Rest Room Upgrade
Increase capacity to deliver community events and support local recovery via tourism, through upgrade of public toilets.
Amamoor$10,000
Stanthorpe and Granite Belt Community Radio Association IncStanthorpe Community Radio Transmission Equipment
Increase communication of local news, events and emergency information, by supporting the establishment of a community radio station.
Stanthorpe$9,773
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
Breakthrough Mental Health Research Foundation Flinders FoundationMental Health First Aid Training - Kangaroo Island & Adelaide Hills
Increase access to support for community members through the delivery of Mental Health First Aid Training to five bushfire impacted communities.
Lobethal$25,000
Charleston Community Centre IncEstablishing a Charleston Community Hub
Increase use and amenity at the Charleston Hall to support recovery, through installation of air conditioning and upgrade to power supply.
Charleston$25,000
Penneshaw Progress Association IncPenneshaw Town Hall Evacuation Centre Catering Facilities
Increase preparedness for future disaster events by upgrading the kitchen at the Penneshaw Town Hall.
Penneshaw$25,000
Rotary Club of Onkaparinga IncOnkaparinga Rotary Fencing Project
Enable volunteers to support community recovery through the purchase of tools, materials, and equipment.
Lobethal$25,000
VICTORIA
Corryong and District Community Youthclub IncRefurbishment of the Corryong Youth Hall to Better Support the Community
Increase amenity and security at Corryong community hall to support community recovery activities, through upgrade to meeting area and storage space.
Corryong - Upper Murray$25,000
Corryong Neighbourhood House IncGiving Youth a Voice
Increase youth representation in community recovery and development, through employment of youth workers to support youth leadership in the Upper Murray.
Corryong$25,000
Upper Murray Innovation FoundationPower to the People
Boost and strengthen economic recovery and promote climate friendly travel, through installation of Electric Vehicle charger at Walwa.
Walwa$25,000
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Shire of KatanningVibrant Katanning
Support economic and social recovery, through upgrading Katanning's central shopping precinct.
Katanning$22,000

UPDATE: Workshop recording is available to watch below:

WA community groups and not-for-profit organisations invited

Community groups and not-for-profits across remote, rural and regional Western Australia are invited to attend a free online grantseeker workshop, hosted by the Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal (FRRR) on Thursday 25 March, from 10:30am to 12:30pm (AWST).

WA grantseeker workshop

The workshop will highlight FRRR’s grant programs and provide grant-writing tips to help community groups become more confident in applying for any of FRRR’s grant programs. This includes the Tackling Tough Times Together (TTTT) program for communities in drought, and the Strengthening Rural Communities (SRC) program, which is highly flexible and supports a broad range of community needs.

Recent WA communities to benefit from TTTT and SRC grants include Esperance, Leonora, Exmouth, Broome, Carnarvon, Quairading and Aldersyde. These grants funded a wide range of locally-led projects including initiatives designed to enhance community wellbeing and resilience, boost local tourism and assist in economic renewal.

FRRR connects goodwill with good purpose for the vitality of remote, rural and regional Australia. As the only national foundation specifically focused on ensuring the social and economic strength of these communities, FRRR’s grant programs give community organisations the opportunity to access funds for a broad range of initiatives that directly benefit local communities.

Register for this free online grantseeker workshop at: https://events.humanitix.com/frrr-wa-grant-seeker-workshop.

Note: Please avoid using Internet Explorer to open this link – use other web browsers such as Chrome, Safari, Firefox or Edge. If you are having difficulties opening the link please contact the TTTT team via toughtimes@frrr.org.au.

Applications for the TTTT and SRC programs are always open. The cut-off date for the next round of TTTT is 24 May 2021. The next cut-off date for SRC grant applications to be considered is 24 August 2021.

29 projects funded to support drought-impacted communities

FRRR has awarded $1,264,396 in grants to 29 projects that will support communities across the country that are experiencing prolonged rainfall shortages. The funding is through its award-winning grants program[1], Tackling Tough Times Together (TTTT).

Tackling Tough Times Together
Quilpie Outback Fringe Festival

The grants will help drought-impacted regions access the resources needed to bring people together, so they can feel connected and supported. These places, like many parts of remote, rural and regional Australia, continue to face the real and persistent challenges caused by Australia’s Big Dry. Despite rainfall across some areas, these extended dry periods and long-term rainfall deficits may continue for some time.[2]

Nina O’Brien, FRRR’s Disaster Resilience and Recovery Lead, said that the TTTT program encourages communities experiencing the Big Dry to take the lead in their recovery and renewal.

Many places facing long-term rainfall shortages have seen their local economy hit. These resilient communities are finding ways to strengthen their economy and encourage local spending and tourism. For Orroroo Carrieton, the District Council is boosting the local economy by developing the Black Rock Wool Press Rotunda as a local attraction. The Rotunda will showcase local historic artifacts including the restored Black Rock Wool Press.

“Other places like Washpool in South Australia and Cecil Plains in Queensland, are renewing their regions by upgrading local facilities to give people a place where they can come together in safety and comfort.

“We are delighted to be able to award these grants to help turn local ideas into reality. We know it’s challenging to get these projects off the ground in the midst of a pandemic, especially when many are dealing with reduced local fundraising capacity, and fatigued volunteers.

“We want people experiencing drought to know that there is still funding available. TTTT is a flexible grant program specifically designed to support communities as they move to recovery. Our team will work with you to help make your project happen, even if it might look a bit different to what you’d initially planned, in light of COVID-19,” Ms O’Brien explained.

Some of the 29 projects awarded this round include:

  • District Council of Orroroo Carrieton, SA – Black Rock Wool Press Rotunda – $143,252 – Boost local economy and tourism opportunities by supporting the development of the Black Rock Wool Press Rotunda to showcase local historical artefacts including the restored Black Rock Wool Press.
  • ABC Foundation Limited, WA – AWRAE: Aboriginal Women’s Research Assistant & Evaluation Training Project – $60,000 – Create opportunities for Indigenous women of Carnarvon and surrounds to develop leadership skills by training them to research and evaluate projects delivered in Indigenous communities.
  • Gooloogong Historical Society Incorporated, NSW – Stage 1 – Restoration and revitalisation of Gooloogong’s meeting place – $59,752 – Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase community connections and sense of place by restoring the Gooloogong Clubhouse to house the Gooloogong Historical Society.
  • Drillham Primary Parents and Citizens Association, QLD – Along the Garden Path – $13,000 – Reduce social isolation and encourage people to come together and connect through a two-day creative arts workshop program.
  • Wheatbelt Business Network Incorporated, WA – Accredited Mental Health First Aid Training in the Wheatbelt – $26,300 – Develop community leaders’ skills and training to provide support for their communities by engaging them in Mental Health First Aid training.

Applications for the TTTT program are always open and groups in drought-affected areas are encouraged to apply for funding to help their community come together to tackle the drought. Grants are available for a broad range of grassroots, community-led initiatives that directly and clearly benefit local communities.

The cut-off dates for future rounds are:

  • 24 May 2021. Outcomes will be advised late August 2021. (Note: Stage One for the $150,000 grant tier must be received by 13 April). Outcomes will be advised late November 2021.
  • 24 August 2021. (Note: Stage One for the $150,000 grant tier must be received by 12 August). Outcomes will be advised late November 2021.

Tackling Tough Times Together is possible thanks to the collaborative support of several donors, including the Australian Government which committed $15M to be distributed over three years. Generous contributions have also been made by Pratt Foundation, Stockland CARE Foundation, Paul Ramsay Foundation, The Snow Foundation, Tim Fairfax Family Foundation, Henroth Group and private donors from across the nation.

To support grants like this through FRRR, make a tax deductible donation here.

The full list of grant recipients and their projects are below.

Jump to: SA | NSW | QLD | VIC | WA

Organisation

Project

Location

Grant

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Up to $150,000

District Council of Orroroo Carrieton Black Rock Wool Press Rotunda
Enhance economic recovery and renewal through the development of the Black Rock Wool Press Rotunda showcasing local historical artifacts including the restored Black Rock Wool Press.
Orroroo $143,252
Wilmington Progress Society Incorporated Wilmington Community Multipurpose Gym Facility Project
Reduce social isolation by facilitating strong social cohesion and connections and increase organisational capacity through the construction of a multipurpose community facility.
Wilmington $108,367

Up to $60,000

Auburn Southern Gateway Committee
Auburn Community Development Committee
Auburn Southern Gateway
Enhance economic recovery and renewal through the installation of town entrance statement signage for the Auburn township in the South Australia Clare Valley.
Auburn $43,826
Washpool Hall Management Committee
Spalding District Incorporated
Washpool Hall Kitchen and Rear Lobby Revitalisation
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity of the Washpool Hall through the upgrade of the kitchen and rear lobby area.
Washpool $60,000

NEW SOUTH WALES

Up to $60,000

Gilgandra Museum and Historical Society Incorporated Experience our Amazing History @ Gilgandra Rural Museum
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability and sustainability of the Gilgandra Museum and Historical Society Incorporated through upgrading the kitchen, exhibition/meeting room flooring, lighting, audio equipment and promotional brochure.
Gilgandra $50,909
Gooloogong Historical Society Incorporated Stage 1 – Restoration and Revitalisation of Gooloogong’s Meeting Place
Reduce volunteer fatigue and increase opportunity for community cohesion through
the restoration of the Gooloogong Clubhouse to house the Gooloogong Historical Society.
Gooloogong $59,752
Lower Lachlan Community Services Incorporated Roof Over Community
Support the capacity and sustainability of Lower Lachlan Community Services through the replacement of the roof.
Lake Cargelligo $50,000
Mandagery Public Hall Land Manager Improved Amenities for the Mandagery Hall
Build the capacity of the Mandagery Public Hall Land Manager with upgrades to the amenities with an Eco-Flo toilet system.
Mandagery $55,000

Up to $20,000

Coleambally Community Club Limited Installation of Tesla Battery for Solar Power Storage
Support climate resilience and sustainability of the Coleambally Community Club through the purchase of a Tesla power wall battery for excess power storage.
Coleambally $19,841
Tullera Community Hall Incorporated No Y17180 27  RAMP US UP
Reduce social isolation and support strong social cohesion and connection with an upgrade of a disabled access ramp at the Tullera Community Hall.
Tullera $18,000

QUEENSLAND

Up to $60,000

Bloomin Beautiful Blackbutt Festival Incorporated Blackbutt Arts Strategy, Big Avocado and Arts Project Officer: Towards a Strategic Future
Support stronger economies and sustainability of local tourism events with the development of the Blackbutt Art Strategy and a Project Plan to build a Big Avocado in Blackbutt.
Blackbutt $58,744
Broxburn Music Club Staged for Success
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity of Broxburn volunteers with the repair and upgrade of the stage and the construction of a lockable shed at The Broxburn Community Grounds.
Broxburn $58,401
Cecil Plains History Group Relocation and Restumping of Norwin CWA Hall
Build the capacity of the Cecil Plains History Group through the relocation and restumping of Norwin CWA Hall to provide an all-weather space for historical displays and a community meeting space.
Cecil Plains $55,000
Goondiwindi Pastoral and Agricultural Society Fencing for the Future
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity of the local organisation to support their community through drought with the installation of internal zone fencing at the Goondiwindi Showgrounds.
Goondiwindi $60,000
Mondure Public Hall Committee Incorporated The Mondure Public Hall Amenities Refurbishment including a Disabled Toilet
Support the capacity and sustainability of the Mondure Public Hall Committee with upgrades and refurbishment to amenities.
Mondure $58,680
Mulga Mates Centre Incorporated Playground upgrade
Reduce volunteer fatigue, and support sustainability and capacity of Mulga Mates Centre with the installation of a playground to improved early childhood development.
Quilpie $53,958
Outback Festival Incorporated ‘Giants of the Outback’
Reduce social isolation and enhance economic recovery through the delivery of the 2021 Outback Festival in Winton, QLD.
Winton $45,000
Roma Historical Precincts Incorporated Preparation of a Business Case to be used as a Supporting Document for the Development of the Roma Butter Factory
Support organisational capacity and sustainability with the development of a business case to support the redevelopment of the Roma Butter Factory as a visitor experience to boost economic activity and visitation in Roma.
Roma $49,800
Tansey Show Society Incorporated Purchase Shaded Grandstands and Water Troughs for Tansey Showgrounds
Build the capacity of Tansey Show Society through the purchase of two transportable shaded grandstands.
Tansey $23,848

Up to $20,000

Bullyard Hall, Sports and Recreation Club Incorporated Assisting the disabled
Reduce social isolation and build community participation opportunities through the installation of an access ramp at Bullyard Hall.
Bullyard $9,460
Drillham Primary Parents and Citizens Association Along the Garden Path
Reduce social isolation through the provision of creative arts activities enabling the community of Miles to come together and connect during times of hardship.
Miles $13,000
Guides Queensland – Warwick District
Guides Queensland
Refresh and Replacement of the Floor Coverings in 1st Warwick Girl Guide Hut
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity, capability, and sustainability of the 1st Warwick Girl Guide Hut through refreshing and replacing floor coverings
Warwick $9,878
Outback Gondwana Foundation Limited Futureproofing with a Forklift
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity of Outback Gondwana Foundation by supplying a forklift.
Eromanga $20,000
Stanthorpe Agricultural Society Gotta get a Gator!
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity of Stanthorpe Agricultural Society through the purchase of a ‘Gator’ utility vehicle to support community events held at the facility.
Stanthorpe $19,140
Warra Tennis Club Incorporated Serving for Sustainability with Solar Panels
Reduce volunteer fatigue and build the capacity and sustainability of the Warra Tennis Club through the purchase and installation of a solar panel system.
Warra $8,710
Maranoa Regional Council Ignite and Excite: Career Pathway Taster
Support opportunities for learning and education participation at Roma, Mitchell, Injune and Surat with the Ignite & Excite: Career Pathway Taster project.
Roma $5,530

VICTORIA

Up to $20,000

Yaapeet Community Club Incorporated Turkey Bottom Lake – Picnic Shelter
Reduce volunteer fatigue and enhance opportunities for social cohesion and connection through the construction of picnic shelter at Turkey Bottom Lake.
Yaapeet $20,000

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Up to $60,000

ABC Foundation Limited AWRAE: Aboriginal Women’s Research Assistant & Evaluation Training Project
Enhance opportunity for leadership development and skills training for Indigenous women of Carnarvon and surrounds, through the delivery of the Aboriginal Women’s Research Assistant and Evaluation Training Project (AWRAE) focused on research and evaluation for projects delivered in Indigenous communities.
Carnarvon $60,000
Wheatbelt Business Network Incorporated Accredited Mental Health First Aid Training in the Wheatbelt
Support leadership development and skills training in Wheatbelt Business Network through the delivery of Mental Health First Aid Training.
Quairading $26,300

[1] 2020 Australian Philanthropy Awards – Best Grant Program

[2] Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology. Drought Rainfall deficiencies and water availability. 7 October 2020. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/2I1PSqA.

FRRR and community groups help young people impacted by bushfires

More than 5,400 students and families in places affected by the Black Summer bushfires are being given a helping hand at the start the new school year, thanks to the generosity of donors from across Australia.

FRRR and community groups help young people impacted by bushfires

Funded through FRRR’s Back to School (BTS) program, students will be able to redeem the $50 gift vouchers for essential school items such as uniforms, school bags or stationery. So far this year, vouchers valued at more than $250,000 have been distributed to families impacted by the 2019-20 bushfires.

FRRR partners with local community groups and Community Foundations who discretely distribute the vouchers to families in need. This means parents don’t have to apply for them but still get the support they need.

The vouchers are funded by FRRR and its donor partners, which include News Corp, Australia Post, Fire Fight Australia concert, Portland House Foundation, UNICEF Australia, J & M Nolan Family Trust, Bertalli Family Foundation, June Canavan Foundation, and Origin Energy Foundation, as well as individual donors.

Natalie Egleton, CEO of FRRR, said that for these students and their families, getting back to school is an important part of the recovery journey.

“As families continue to navigate their recovery journey after the bushfires, they are also dealing with the additional challenges caused by the pandemic.

“These vouchers are a small way of helping students and families to have one less thing to worry about – whether they cover the cost of a pair of school shoes, a couple of school jumpers, or even a sleeping bag that a child can use for school camp,” Ms Egleton explained.

Northern Rivers Community Foundation (NRCF) is one of the Community Foundations helping to distribute the vouchers in their region. NRCF Executive Officer, Emily Berry, said that the vouchers are for purchasing items that students may have lost in the fires and have never been able to replace due to financial difficulties.

“We hope these vouchers support inclusion for the students, helping them fit into their school environment and go on to realise their potential, instead of feeling different, or excluded because they are unable to purchase school essentials,” Ms Berry said.

As part of the BTS program, a further 30 Community Foundations and locally-based community groups are helping to distribute 7,000 BTS vouchers to students and families in rural regions not affected by the 2019-20 bushfires.

In total, more than $590,000 has been distributed in vouchers to students and families across Australia through the BTS program this year.

“Last year was tough for everyone, especially for those living in the bush. Fifty dollars may not seem much, but for these families it can help to alleviate the pressure they face at the start of a new school year,” Ms Egleton said.

From our previous experience in supporting disaster-affected communities, we know that young people have been significantly affected by the fires, and it can take families a long time to get back on their feet again. FRRR is conducting another dedicated round of the Back to School program, which will provide vouchers in time for winter uniform and shoes. Applications are open now.

Vouchers were awarded to support the following Local Government Areas:

Bushfire Recovery stream
Alpine (S)Lismore (C)
Bega Valley (A)Richmond Valley (A)
Central Coast (C) (NSW)Snowy Monaro Regional (A)
Clarence Valley (A)Snowy Valleys (A)
East Gippsland (S)Towong (S)
Greater Hume Shire (A)Wingecarribee (A)
Kyogle (A)Yorke Peninsula (DC)
General stream
Albury (C)Cleve (DC)Mid Murray (DC)Streaky Bay (DC)
Alexandrina (DC)Cloncurry (S)Mid-Coast (A)Sunshine Coast (R)
Alice Springs (T)Cowra (A)Moorabool (S)Tatiara (DC)
Ballarat (C)Elliston (DC)Mount Gambier (C)Toowoomba (R)
Ballina (A)Federation (A)Mount Isa (C)Tumby Bay (DC)
Barkly (R)Franklin Harbour (DC)Naracoorte and Lucindale (DC)Tweed (A)
Barossa (DC)Golden Plains (S)Northern Grampians (S)Victor Harbor (C)
Bass Coast (S)Grant (DC)Peterborough (DC)Victoria Daly (R)
Baw Baw (S)Hepburn (S)Port Augusta (C)Wagga Wagga (C)
Benalla (RC)Hinchinbrook (S)Port Lincoln (C)Wangaratta (RC)
Boulia (S)Indigo (S)Port Pirie City and Dists (M)Wattle Range (DC)
Broken Hill (C)Kimba (DC)Pyrenees, VicWhyalla (C)
Buloke (S)Kingston (DC) (SA)Richmond (S)Wodonga (C)
Byron (A)Kyogle (A)Robe (DC)Wudinna (DC)
Campaspe (S)Latrobe (C) (Vic.)Roper Gulf (R)Yankalilla (DC)
Ceduna (DC)Light (RegC)South Gippsland (S)Yorke Peninsula (DC)
Central Darling (A)Lower Eyre Peninsula (DC)Strathbogie (S)